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Skyline

Just carry a camera obscura with you at all times.
For residents, the growth has ushered in an ever-changing skyline with record-breaking heights and a huge spike in noise complaints.
At 131 stories and 1,550 feet, the luxury residential tower will be the second tallest structure in the U.S.
Gothamist spoke with Rutgers professor Jason Barr about how Manhattan became a vertical city, the role of geology in shaping the skyline, and affordable housing.
Two photos taken fifteen years apart from the exact same vantage point show the big and small changes in the Manhattan skyline.
Billionaire Pinhead cosplayers welcome!
NYC's skyline is now a part of Legoland.
Ready or not, something really tall is coming.
The future is going to be very skinny.
The Manhattan skyline currently boasts the wattage of a million stars, but a new City Council bill may require it to dim on behalf of the environment.
It's one thing to read about all the skyscrapers and luxury buildings going up in Midtown—it's another to see just what an impact these obelisks will have on the Manhattan skyline.
The Port Authority also objects to the dinnerware with the Lincoln and Holland Tunnels.
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