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Rezoning

"No matter where you stood on the rezoning, whether you're for or against it...this legislation just did harm and did not help anyone.”
Since the rezoning in 2016, just 100 subsidized units have opened their doors to tenants.
Members ignored the wishes of the local council member, whose district would be impacted by the project.
The rezoning is the first to mandate affordable housing in a wealthy, predominantly white neighborhood.
“It’s now up to the City Council to do the right thing and say no to this wrongheaded, destructive plan.”
"The rejection of the 960 Franklin Avenue proposal sends a powerful message to developers that the City will not be railroaded into overturning its own carefully considered zoning regulations."
Last week, the City Council voted to upzone the south end of the island, paving the way for nearly 4 million feet of new development, including office, hotel, and retail space near the current site of the abandoned military barracks.
The plan would add affordable housing to two of Manhattan’s wealthiest neighborhoods, and has been the center of contentious fights amongst New Yorkers.
The mayor's statement comes after a years-long contentious battle between residents and a high-profile developer who sought to raise two 39-story towers overlooking the Brooklyn Botanic Garden.
Under the plan, the de Blasio Administration will seek to create or preserve 4,100 units of affordable housing across the low-income, northern Manhattan neighborhood by 2032.
The proposal would bring about 3,200 apartments to the area—800 of which would be below-market rate.
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