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Press credentials

The bill also prohibits the city from seizing a journalist's press credential until after a hearing.
For decades, the NYPD has set the criteria for journalists who are granted official press credentials, which allow reporters access to certain restricted areas. That's about to change.
In this opinion piece, freelance journalist JB Nicholas argues that controversial new proposed rules for press credentials are actually an improvement.
We had to pay Norman Siegel $5,000 to represent us during an appeal, but the NYPD finally issued Gothamist press credentials. Here's how it went down.
In 2009, the NYPD was forced to revise the rules governing press credentials and let online media outlets obtain press passes. But as we've found out, the application process is Kafkaesque, and nothing's really changed.
Another video has surfaced showing the NYPD arresting a man who appears to be protester Patrick Wedes as he passively stands and films the police ordering protesters to leave.
We're still confirming the identity of the photographer, but based on his own muffled introduction to the police officer, it seems to be NY Times photographer Robert Stolarik.
Protesters ran through the park, defacing signs, complimenting the choice of tents and eating the food in the "kitchen." In short: it was a bizarre scene.
"I see these two guys tell this protester, who agreed to be interviewed, that they were with the Daily News," the paper's social media PA, Colin Jones, tells us.
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