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Operation lucky bag

Recent events at a Brooklyn Target suggest yes.
Myers' attorney, Ann Mauer, called the sting that nabbed her client "certainly the most extreme version of the operation that we've seen."
A tourist who was enjoying Central Park with his family got arrested as part of the NYPD's controversial "Operation Lucky Bag." He's now suing the city for $1 million and has vowed never to return.
The designation of the victim as an "asshole" unintentionally illustrates what's wrong with the NYPD's Operation Lucky Bag: who wouldn't pick this thing up?
In a strange attempt to stop bicycle thefts in the East Village the NYPD recently went around trying to sell deliverymen stolen bikes and then arresting those who did.
According to the NYPD, Operation Lucky Bag has resulted in 34 arrests since the beginning of March. But is this just a case of entrapment goosing the stats?
Given that the law states that people have 10 days to return lost property to its owners or the police department, an attorney says people who are caught should "pursue a lawsuit for false arrest."
Operation Lucky Bag, the NYPD program that threatened to ensnare good Samaritans
The MTA is refreshing its campaign to remind mass transit riders
Earlier this week, some Pratt art students decided to leave a duffel
The subway system has hit a new milestone of sorts: Having the
Last February, the NYPD announced that it was conducting "Operation Lucky
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