Advertisement

Ida

The state will use federal disaster money to fund its Blue Acres program, offering homeowners market-rate prices for their properties so they can relocate.
New York City council members pressed the city’s climate officials this week about the need for flood emergency plans.
In one of the New Jersey communities hardest hit by Ida, residents who can’t afford to elevate their homes plan to move out.
Recovery from storm damage continues, but much of the family-oriented science and technology institution is back in business.
De Blasio achieved success toward making New York City carbon neutral by 2050, but his administration struggled to break ground on its storm surge and sea level rise infrastructure projects.
Those who did receive the aid got on average $4,700, which advocates say hasn’t come close to helping rebuild their lives.
Rainfall could reach up to five inches by Tuesday evening.
“It’s as if it were prohibited for immigrants to attain housing with dignity.”
“We can close gaps in aid and help New Yorkers in need,” Governor Kathy Hochul said.
A group of southeast Queens residents, who were among the worst hit by the September 1st storm, say flooding issues have plagued the neighborhood for decades.
Investigators and researchers are unraveling the mixture of calamities that contributed to people perishing in underground dwellings during Ida's flash floods.
The Department of Buildings had previously said that five of the six locations where residents died were found to be illegally converted basement or cellar units.
arrow Back To Top