Advertisement

Flooding

“We're seeing such a dramatic change in the type of weather events that we're facing as a result of climate change," said FEMA Administrator Deanne Criswell, New York City's former OEM commissioner.
Residents say they’ve been waiting 10 years – since Superstorm Sandy – for city officials to develop climate resiliency and emergency responses.
The project, part of a larger package of city resiliency measures, is aimed at alleviating chronic flooding in Queens.
Researchers are analyzing 100 years worth of snowfall data, finding significant declines linked to climate change.
"Our fantastic facilities staff are on the front line every day making sure our City’s young people have safe, secure places to learn, including overnight if needed."
Nearly four inches of rain is expected in New York City.
Rainfall could reach up to five inches by Tuesday evening.
“It’s as if it were prohibited for immigrants to attain housing with dignity.”
Two maps can tell the story of a street in Hollis.
A council member says tropical storm Ida showed that upgrading units below street level, often occupied by the poor, is a matter of life and death in the era of climate change
“For the first 20 years or so, it was just us advocates screaming like this needs to get done. And none of the government agencies would listen to us."
A group of southeast Queens residents, who were among the worst hit by the September 1st storm, say flooding issues have plagued the neighborhood for decades.
arrow Back To Top