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Civilian complaint review board

The federal monitor, who has been overseeing the police division for five years, says his team’s work has been delayed by the pandemic.
New figures released from the Civilian Complaint Review Board show the NYPD has only imposed discipline 42% of the time in cases involving “serious misconduct.”
According to a new report published Wednesday by the Independent Budget Office, more than a quarter of positions at the Civilian Complaint Review Board remain unfilled, and the vacancies are contributing to delays in investigating complaints of police misconduct.
Previously, city rules forced the agency to wait until receiving a formal complaint before launching an investigation.
The CCRB's Chairman, Rev. Fredrick Davie, testified today at a City Council hearing in support of legislation that would grant the agency the power to start its own investigations into police misconduct.
"Those comments were made because they were soundbites," Mullins said at his disciplinary trial on Monday. "They drew attention to the harm that was being caused to the men and women of the NYPD."
Williams was killed in a struggle with police that also resulted in the friendly-fire death of a plainclothes officer.
Using information from civilian complaints, a massive network emerges, revealing tightly-knit clusters of officers that civilians have repeatedly accused of abuse.
According to the Civilian Complaint Review Board's report, violations ranged from excessive force and untruthful statements to offensive language and discourtesy.
The four ex-employee are suing the Civilian Complaint Review Board (CCRB), saying their First Amendment rights were violated when their jobs were terminated in November
“What is the CCRB looking for?"
The cuts represent around 5 percent of the CCRB's existing $19 million budget.
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