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Brooklyn botanic garden

Send a shell-pink flare into the sky, for the time of our erubescence is upon us. Cherry blossom trees around the city have started to bloom.
They've got "over one million dazzling lights," and it will take you a soulful hour to navigate your way through it all.
"The rejection of the 960 Franklin Avenue proposal sends a powerful message to developers that the City will not be railroaded into overturning its own carefully considered zoning regulations."
Today is gonna be the day that you wanna go over to BBG and frolic amongst them.
The mayor's statement comes after a years-long contentious battle between residents and a high-profile developer who sought to raise two 39-story towers overlooking the Brooklyn Botanic Garden.
The garden is currently planning its reopening, and details will be announced soon.
We visited the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, currently closed because of the pandemic, for a tour of their cherry blossoms.
In its most political statement and appeal to date, the Brooklyn Botanic Garden has unveiled a new exhibit to protest a developer's plan to build two 39-story residential towers that organization officials say will cast damaging shadows.
The developer of a controversial project that would block sunlight from reaching parts of Brooklyn Botanic Garden said officials at the 110-year-old institution would deprive the surrounding neighborhood of badly needed affordable housing.
Construction forced the cancellation of big cosplay fashion show, but there were still plenty of wonderfully creative outfits to admire on the grounds.
Community members argued that the project near Franklin Avenue would cast damaging shadows on nearby Brooklyn Botanic Garden. The same battle is playing out with a yet-to-be-approved project at 960 Franklin Avenue.
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