During the GOP Presidential debate on Thursday night, some vocal Republicans could be heard booing a gay active member of the military who asked a question about the now-defunct "Don't Ask Don't Tell" military policy. The aptly-renamed Rick Santorum was given a lot of flack for seemingly ignoring the boos as he gave his typically backwards response to the question. But yesterday, Santorum lamented the acoustics of the debate venue, and claimed he hadn't heard the boos at the time: "I condemn the people who booed that gay soldier," he told Fox News' Megyn Kelly too-little-too-late. Watch his sorta mea culpa below.

Santorum went on to further clarify:

I have to admit, I seriously did not hear those boos. Had I heard them, I certainly would have commented on them. But, as you know, when you're in that sort of environment, you're sort of focused on the question and formulating you answer, and I just didn't hear those couple of boos that were out there. But certainly had I, I would've said, "Don't do that. This man is serving our country and we are to thank him for his service."

Kelly, who was the moderator of the debate, offered some further support to Santorum by saying she wasn't sure whether the heckling was aimed at the soldier, or aimed at the policy he was asking about...even though it's a moot point: whichever thing they were booing about, it was a nakedly dumb and ugly moment.

As the Huffington Post points out, Santorum is increasingly alone in his stance, even among his other conservative colleagues, when it comes to bringing back DADT: "Following the debate, no other candidate or campaign offered support for a reinstitution of the law." Former New Mexico governor Gary Johnson echoed that sentiment, saying he regretted not calling out those hecklers at the time: "The booing that occurred last night at the event is not the Republican Party that I belong to."