People have been making fun of the Murray Hill and its

dorms

apartment buildings filled with the freshly graduated for years. But that doesn't mean its time to stop now. Especially when the Times offers up as enjoyable a portrait of our youth as they have today. Murray Hill, what wonders you offer!

The gist of the story you know, but its the quotes that make the whole thing special:

  • They all know each other. "Joshua Schwadron, who lived until recently in another of Murray Hill’s postgraduate hives, could claim Facebook friendships with half of the residents." And, from another denizen talking about really anyone on the street, “If I don’t know them, I’m sure I have a friend who knows them.”
  • Their parents in Long Island love the location. "'For people like me it’s really easy,' Ms. Katz said, 'because your parents take the tunnel and they’re right there.'"
  • They want to keep it in the family. “If I meet a guy in the laundry room of Windsor Court, he probably has a good job, probably went to a good school,” Ms. Katz explained.
  • They like to drink. Especially at birthday parties "If 50 friends live nearby, it’s easy to have a birthday party every weekend."
  • They eventually figure out that you are laughing at them. "Ms. Katz said Murray Hill 'is starting to lose its coolness.' Indeed, whenever she is asked where she lives, Ms. Katz answers Murray Hill, 'but I say it with a sarcastic tone because I’m making fun of myself.'

Of course, we've got nothing against Murray Hill's post-college crowd. Really, where else are they going to learn about life in the city while simultaneously staying out of our way? And this there they can either realize how much more there is to explore in New York and move to a different neighborhood (hopefully losing some of their tack while they are at it) or they can do their post-college drinking on the Hill and then leave.

The people we feel sorry for are the families and real grown-ups who live in some of those pseudo-dorms (they exist, we know some)—nobody should have to be an RA in their own home.