This past Saturday was the city's second of three Summer Streets weekends. One of the bigger issues from last week's first try seemed to be that pedestrians and bicyclists weren't as aware of each others' space as they could be. And so the Department of Transportation responded with fast and slow lanes.

However, a Streetsblog writer wonders how effective the lanes were, given:


The second thing we noticed was an event "marshal," stationed in the middle of Park Avenue at 40th, cheerfully repeating this instruction to passersby: "Bikers to the left, walkers to the right." Based on all I'd read about cyclists and pedestrians co-mingling peacefully during the first week of Summer Streets (which we missed), this seemed odd.

Not for long, though, as Jennifer and I were nearly hit by speeding bikes no fewer than three times between 40th Street and low 20s. Though we stayed to the right in the designated "slow lane," we were passed on the right more than once. Bells were few and far between, while verbal warnings, in our experience, were non-existent. Realizing that a half-step toward either curb at the wrong moment could result in injury, we learned to look over our shoulders before making any lateral moves.

The writer adds, "While we encountered a handful of cyclists behaving irresponsibly, it goes without saying that we were passed by hundreds more who were courteous and respectful of the potential for bodily harm, to pedestrians and themselves."