Hours after announcing his bid for NYC Comptroller, former Governor Eliot Spitzer weathered the mid-day heat wave in Union Square. His goal? To collect some of the 3,750 signatures needed in order to get his name on the ballot. The result? About seven signatures, a suit covered in sweat, a huge swarm of reporters closing in on him, and infamous heckler Joey Boots yelling, "Hey Spitzer, what's the going rate for a hooker?"

It was a big first day for the former Governor, who left office in disgrace after being caught frequenting prostitutes. When asked if the timing of his announcement had anything to do with Mayoral candidate and crotch-shot enthusiast Anthony Weiner's return to politics, Spitzer was matter-of-fact in his denial.

"Not at all, not at all," he said. "Here's why, New Yorkers are forgiving, but I knew that. New Yorkers have good souls and a sense of forgiveness. But whether that forgiveness extends to me is a whole other separate issue. That is why I draw no logical connection between him and anybody else or me. I think this is a question of how you present yourself and what you have done."

Spitzer also denied that the timing of his Comptroller bid had anything to do with the release of his book, which he repeatedly reminded the crowd is set to hit shelves next week. The former Governor credited his late entrance into the race to just being super busy with his super busy life.

"I was busy doing other things like my book which is just recently finished, and coming out next week, teaching, doing a TV show, running our family business," Spitzer said. "And so now I said okay I want to serve, I want to ask for forgiveness, and present an opportunity to the public for this office to do more."

When asked how many signatures he had so far, Spitzer replied, “None so far because I’m chatting with you guys, but I am sure we will get 'em." He also confirmed that he will be funding his own campaign, but declined to give a specific figure to the amount he was willing to spend.

"You know, this is not a matter of spending more or less than anybody else," Spitzer said, referring to his lone opponent in the race, Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer. "Scott is going to spend the statutory limit, over six million dollars of public money. All I want is to spend enough money so I'm heard, that's all."

Eventually a sweaty Spitzer attempted to walk away from the mass of reporters, but without any political advisors or handlers around, he had no way to shake the crowd. He did, however, get to try some honey in the farmers market, and nab a few signatures on his way out of the park.