President Obama had a bumpy arrival in Cartagena, Colombia yesterday for the sixth annual Summit of the Americas when a dozen secret service agents were relieved of duty and sent home amid allegations of misconduct involving prostitution. According to the Washington Post, at least one agent has been accused of involvement with prostitutes in Cartagena. “They had arranged to have a bunch of prostitutes come by and one of the agents refused to pay a prostitute,” author Ronald Kessler, a leading experts on the Secret Service and former Washington Post reporter, told the Daily News. “Yes, doubly good judgement there.”

Kessler told the Daily News the spurned hooker went to the police to report the lack of payment. “Their careers are over,” he said, before listing all the reasons why: “Number one, it is against basic ethics to go to a prostitute. Number two, it is incredibly embarrassing to the White House. And number three, it could leave them open to blackmail and a possible assassination attempt.”

Officials said the dismissals wouldn't affect the Summit of the Americas, a gathering of 33 of the hemisphere’s 35 leaders to discuss economic policy and trade. A senior official told Fox News the charges were serious enough to require mediation by diplomats. According to AP, a hotel employee also reported seeing the agents drinking heavily during their stay in Cartagena before Obama's arrival.

Kessler told CNN this was "clearly the biggest scandal in Secret Service history." Secret Service spokesman Edwin Donovan confirmed the removal of the agents in a statement:

There have been allegations of misconduct made against Secret Service personnel in Cartagena, Colombia prior to the President’s trip. Because of this, those personnel are being relieved of their assignments, returned to their place of duty, and are being replaced by other Secret Service personnel.

The Secret Service takes all allegations of misconduct seriously. This entire matter has been turned over to our Office of Professional Responsibility, which serves as the agency’s internal affairs component. These personnel changes will not affect the comprehensive security plan that has been prepared in advance of the President’s trip.