New Yorkers may have seen a few flakes today, but those who'd been hoping to see measurable snowfall, which is defined as at least a tenth of an inch, may have their hopes dashed. As of Wednesday afternoon, the city looked likely to remain without a measurable accumulation of snowfall. Forecasts earlier in the week had predicted powder in Central Park by 1 p.m.

By 3 p.m. Wednesday, the snow was looking "more like a trace," said Bryan Ramsey, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service. He said it looked unlikely to count, but added that it was too early to make the call.

If no measurable snowfall arrives on Wednesday, it would mark 322 days since the last time it snowed in Central Park. Though the city has seen its share of flakes, snow hasn’t piled up to measurable levels.

The city is on track to break a 50-year-old record for the latest date of measurable snowfall. The current milestone was set Jan. 29, 1973.

Last week, the city surpassed a record set on Jan. 21, 1871 for the season's second-latest snow recorded in Central Park.

Dave Radell, another meteorologist with the NWS, said the city's current above-freezing temperatures are making any imminent chance of measurable snowfall “less and less likely.”

“It looks dry for the next several days,” he said. “We are going to make a run at the latest date of the first measurable snowfall in the city.”

Meanwhile, Orange County, in the lower Hudson Valley, is expected to get up to 5 inches of snowfall, similar to parts of southwestern Connecticut. Westchester and parts of northeastern New Jersey were expected to get more snow than Central Park, but not much snowfall would accumulate there — “maybe an inch,” Radell said.

The possibility of moderate coastal flooding is expected in southern Queens later today, with the possibility of minor flooding in southern Brooklyn and parts of Staten Island.

Several northeastern cities have similarly seen delays in measurable snowfall this winter.

This headline has been changed.