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Prosecutors: Scammer Stole $275K Pretending To Be A German Heiress

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Manhattan prosecutors say that an industrious 26-year-old scammer fleeced banks, an investment house, and a friend during a 10-month grifting spree that saw her steal almost $300,000 while pretending to be a German heiress.

Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance, Jr., announced that Anna Sorokin, who was also known as Anna Delvey, was indicted for multiple big money thefts she committed between November of 2016 and August 2017, totaling about $275,000. Sorokin bounced checks to banks, got huge loans from them, and in one instance got a friend to pay for a five-figure vacation, according to investigators.

At the end of November 2016, Sorokin allegedly went to City National Bank in Midtown in the guise of a German heiress looking for a $22 million loan to open a private club. While the bank turned her down for that, a few weeks later managed to convince them to overdraft her account for a $100,000 loan she never paid back. Sorokin then allegedly spent $55,000 of that loan on a personal trainer, luxury shopping, and living it up at the 11 Howard Hotel.

In April of this year, Sorokin allegedly passed off $160,000 in bad checks to Citibank and got $70,000 out of her account before the bank realized the checks were bad. Prosecutors say Sorokin took a private plane to the Berkshire Hathaway Annual Shareholders Meeting the next month, and never actually paid the company for the $35,000 flight.

Sorokin also allegedly managed to scam a $62,000 vacation to Morocco out of a friend in May, by making up excused about why her debit card was getting declined and getting the friend to cover the entire trip under the false pretense Sorokin would pay her back. Finally, Sorokin is alleged to have deposited $15,000 in bad checks to Signature Bank in August and withdrew $8,200 before the bank realized the flim flam.

For Sorokin's many alleged scams, prosectors charged her with attempted grand larceny in the first degree, grand larceny in the second and third Degrees, and theft of services.

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