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Property Manager At Queens 'Nazi Lobby' Building Arrested, Charged With Stalking

The building manager of the apartment complex with the infamous "Nazi Lobby" was arrested and charged with stalking this weekend, the NYPD confirmed.

Neal Milano, the 70-year-old property manager of 47-55 39th Place who residents have accused of a racist harassment campaign due to Fascist iconography in the building's lobby, was cuffed Sunday afternoon and charged with stalking an unnamed 43-year-old woman, in a complaint that dated back to July this year.

According to police, the woman accused Milano of following her around and yelling at her on numerous occasions between September of last year and this past July, and grabbing her at one point. While the woman lived at 47-55 39th Place during the alleged stalking campaign, police told the Daily News that it had nothing to do with the ongoing lobby dispute, which has prompted an investigation by the New York City Commission on Human Rights.

Instead, the woman told the paper that her complaint stemmed from numerous instances of Milano allegedly harassing over violations of what he said were the building's rules, including rules about having guests over at the apartment complex. Residents claimed that Milano particularly called attention to non-white guests of residents who lived in the building.

The unnamed woman said that the encounters with Milano got physical at one point, and she told the News that in order to show the woman a sign indicating the building's rules, he "grabbed me from my neck to drag me there and shoved my head in the wall to show me," after she had a friend visit. She also accused him of telling her "This is Hitler’s concentration camp that you are in," when she questioned the building's rules.

Police sources told NY1 that cops were taking away Milano's gun permit, and are confiscating any weapons he might have. Milano was arrested yesterday afternoon at the airport after he returned to the country from a trip abroad. He told the News that the woman's complaints were merely "accusations."

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