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WTC Wreckage, Survivors' Stairs: Photos Inside The 9/11 Memorial Museum

Tridents in the museum's atrium<br/>


A 19.8-foot long piece of the North Tower Antenna, which is one-twentieth of the 360-foot-tall transmission tower. Six broadcast engineers, working with five television stations, were working from offices.<br/>


The "Last Column" was the last one removed from the WTC site on May 30, 2002. It's 58 tons and 36 feet tall and bears the signatures of and photographs from recovery workers, first responders, volunteers and victims’ relatives.<br/>



Ladder Company 3's truck; 11 members of FDNY Ladder Company 3 responded to the attacks and they were known to have reached the 35th floor by 9:21 a.m. All members were killed when the tower collapsed at 10:28 a.m. (the front cab of this fire truck was shorn off by the tower's debris). <br/>


A piece of plane wreckage<br/>


The base of the WTC tridents.<br/>



An elevator motor from the North Tower; when the plane hit the North Tower, hundreds were trapped above the 93rd floor. It used to move 1,600 feet per minute.<br/>


A bike rack salvaged from Vesey Street; only one owner claimed a bike.<br/>


A box column<br/>


Some of the pieces of artwork on the Tribute Walk<br/>



Engine 21 was dispatched after Flight 175 hit the South Tower. It was parked on Vesey Street under a pedestrian overpass, with the cab exposed; the front was damaged by flaming debris.<br>



An animation of the flight path<br/>


The slurry wall, part of the original WTC foundation<br/>


Recovery crews removing steel and debris used "grappler claws" at the site; spotters were also there to look in each load for human remains.<br/>


Handwritten notes<br/>


The North Tower facade has jointed pieces of steel, but when Flight 11 hit the tower, the plane's underbelly scraped the top of this part with so much force it twisted and shredded the steel.<br/>


What Chelsea Jeans looked liked after the WTC collapsed—full of dust, ashes and debris<br/>



A piece of steel that was once part of the North Tower's facade—this was at the point of impact where Flight 11 hit the building from floors 93 through 99.<br/>


A <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/03/nyregion/an-inscription-taken-out-of-poetic-context-and-placed-on-a-9-11-memorial.html">semi-controversial </a>quote from "The Aeneid," made out of 9/11 steel <br/>


Steel<br/>


Standing box column<br/>


The Vesey Street stairs, which are known as the Survivors' Stairs because <A href="http://gothamist.com/2008/03/09/911_survivors_s.php">hundreds used them to leave the WTC</a>.<br/>


Projection on one of the tridents<br>



Minoru Yamasaki's model of the towers<br>


Ramzi Yousef's laptop<br/>


From the "We Remember" exhibit<br/>