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New High Line Renderings Unveiled!

<p>"A straight walkway, running alongside the railroad tracks, is surrounded by a landscape of native species that once grew spontaneously on the High Line, interspersed with new species that ensure bloom throughout the growing season."</p>


<p>"Steel is cut away and replaced by glass, providing a view up 10th Avenue, and revealing High Line visitors to those on street level."</p>


<p>"Steps and ramps cut into an elevated square over 10th Avenue, allowing visitors to descend into the structure."</p>



<p>"The High Line's only lawn "peels up" at 23rd Street, where the High Line widens, providing crosstown views of the Manhattan skyline and the Hudson River. A stepped seating feature adds another layer of use to this central gathering area."</p>


<p>"Where the High Line begins to narrow in Chelsea,plantings grow denser, with shrubs and trees adding a variety of textures."</p>


<p>" tA metal walkway lifts off from High Line level, allowing the landscape to fill in below. Visitors are lifted into the shady canopy of a sumac forest. Planting here takes advantage of a cooler, shadier condition between tall buildings, where trees originally grew up once the trains stopped running."</p>



<p>"The Gansevoort Woodland, overlooking Washington Street, features dense trees and plantings along the High Line’s edge."</p>


<p>"The Sundeck, between 14th and 15th Streets, offers unobstructed views over the Hudson River. Water emerges from the spaces between planks to skim the upper walkway, while on the lower level, rail tracks are reinstalled in plantings derived from the High Line's self-sown landscape."</p>


<p>"A spur of the flyover's metal walkway brings visitors to a view over 26th Street. A viewing frame recalls the billboards that were once attached to the High Line."</p>


<p>"A straight walkway, running alongside the railroad tracks, is surrounded by a landscape of native species that once grew spontaneously on the High Line, interspersed with new species that ensure bloom throughout the growing season."</p>


<p>"'Slow stairs' rise from the 14th Street sidewalk, supplemented by an elevator. The stairs bring visitors up between the High Line's massive steel beams, while their legs and feet can be seen from the sidewalk below."</p>


<p>"The High Line's dramatic curve westward along 30th Street is augmented with an access point, with the stair intersecting the structure and rising up through it."</p>



<p>"Access points are located approximately every two to three blocks on Sections 1 and 2 of the High Line. In many locations, these access points include both stairs and elevators."</p>