Last week, four-star general David Petraeus resigned from his role as director of the CIA because of an extramarital affair with his biographer, Paula Broadwell. And ever since, there has been bizarre revelation after bizarre revelation, and the scandal has become more of a pentagonal shape, roping in another Army general, some Tampa socialites, and at least one topless FBI agent. More and more information continues to seep out about Jill Kelley, the self-proclaimed military “social liaison” (whose self-proclaimed title is completely made up) who incurred the wrath of Broadwell and helped bring the whole affair to light. Let's go through this piece by piece.

"Cat Fight" Emails: Although Kelley claims there was nothing between her and Petraeus, Broadwell sent her a series of harassing emails that spooked Kelley enough that she contacted the FBI. According to The Daily Beast, there were no real threats though: “More like, ‘Who do you think you are? … You parade around the base … You need to take it down a notch,’” a source told them.

In that same Daily Beast report, they note that the emails between Broadwell and Petraeus left nothing to the imagination: it was clear they were having an affair, and they tried to hide their messages using a trick where they left unsent drafts in their inboxes, and then logged into each other's account to read them. The fact that Petraeus was letting Broadwell have access to his email may have been one of the most damning details of the investigation so far.

The Daily Beast added this salacious speculation into their piece: "The besotted Broadwell may have viewed the curvaceous Kelley as a threat. Broadwell may be able to run a six-minute mile with Petraeus, but Kelley looks like a woman who lets the guys do all the running—and in her direction." So...they're saying she looks like a slut?

"Phone Sex" Emails: In the course of that investigation, officials also became aware of the fact Kelley had exchanged thousands of emails with American commander in Afghanistan Gen. John Allen. There have been very mixed reports on the content of those emails: one official told Fox News they'd liken the email exchanges to "phone sex."

Another said: "This was a serious enough matter that those who examined the emails thought it should be referred to the secretary of defense, and the secretary made the decision to turn it over to the inspector general," the official said. "He would not have thrust this into the limelight without good cause." CBS News correspondent Bob Orr said Pentagon and FBI sources describe the communications as "potentially inappropriate" and "flirtatious."

But another source told CBS that the vast majority of the emails between Allen and Kelley were "completely innocuous." The official added that in some of the emails, Kelley would say things like, "saw you on television and you were terrific," and Allen would write back with "thanks, sweetheart." The official said the two never discussed sex and that Allen had never been alone with Kelley.

Twin Sister Legal Case: Whether or not that last bit about the two never being alone together is true, Allen and Petraeus both were fond enough of Kelley to write letters on behalf of her socialite twin sister, Natalie Khawam, who was involved in a child-custody case (which she lost) with ex-husband Grayson Wolfe, who worked closely with the Bush Administration and served in Iraq with the Coalition Provisional Authority.

In making his ruling against her, the judge in the case said that Khawam “appears to lack any appreciation or respect for the importance of honesty and integrity in her interactions with her family, employers, and others with whom she comes in contact.”

Broke: It seems both sisters are broke. Khawam, who is being sued by her former lawyers in Montgomery County Circuit Court for unpaid legal fees, is in debt about $3 million. Things are apparently just as bad for Kelley: the Tampa home where they hosted many a military gathering has been in foreclosure since 2010. There's lots more complicated numbers involved with their legal situation. Nevertheless, the family lived above their means in order to keep up a lavish lifestyle and host lots of social and charity events for the army.

"Social Liaison": Which brings us back around to her position as a military "social liaison." A military official told the Washington Post that “there’s no such thing." They write that the made-up title appears to be a polite way of saying “rich Tampa socialite who likes to hang with four-star generals.” The army added that she was a private citizen and volunteer, never an employee, and that she never held an official position, paid or unpaid.

But having a made-up position in the military entitles you to military services and perks, right? Kelley seems to be adamant that's true: she and has called police to her home several times in the past few days complaining about reporters and photographers staking out her home, invoking "diplomatic protection" even though she is neither a diplomat nor a member of the military.

"You know, I don't know if by any chance, because I'm an honorary consul general, so I have inviolability, so they should not be able to cross my property. I don't know if you want to get diplomatic protection involved as well," she was recorded saying. “Diplomatic immunity, diplomatic protection, is only given to American personnel. Diplomatic personnel in foreign countries," Col. E.J. Otero explained to WTVT. You can hear more of the calls below.

Update: As a commenter pointed out, a Korean (non-honorary) diplomatic official in Atlanta confirmed that Kelley does have an "honorary consul" title from the South Korean government. "He emphasized that there was no irregularity in tapping her for the largely symbolic post," Yonhap News Agency reported. The Washington Post also notes she drives a Mercedes with “Honorary Consul” vanity plates. Nevertheless, it doesn't seem like an honorary position with no actual standing would give her the right to diplomatic protection.