After the Obama Administration announced that the U.S. would not deport some young illegal immigrants, New York lawmakers rushed to praise the decision. However, they hope for more: Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. said, "While President Obama’s decision today will help towards fulfilling the promise of the American Dream, we must keep fighting for comprehensive immigration reform including the DREAM Act at a federal level and for immigrants' rights issues at a local and state level. These students deserve the chance to get a good education, and help grow our economy."

Effective immediately, the Department of Homeland Security said that illegal immigrants under the age of 30 who are otherwise law-abiding residents can seek two-year deferments of deportation action subject to renewal. People who are eligible under the guidelines DHS laid out will also be permitted to obtain work permits. Federal authorities will take a relaxed approach toward illegal immigrants who arrived in the United States before the age of 16 and who are under 30. They must also have lived in the country continuously for at least five years before today; be a current student, high-school graduate or general equivalency degree recipient; or be an honorably discharged member of the U.S. military.

Mayor Bloomberg, who doesn't think illegal immigrants already in the States should be deported, said:

With its action today, the Obama Administration is making a significant portion of the DREAM Act a reality. Ending deportations of innocent young people who have the potential to drive tomorrow’s economy is long overdue, as are many common-sense reforms needed to center our immigration policy around our economic needs. We have a system that is choking our economic growth by chasing away the entrepreneurs who can create jobs and the talented people businesses need to succeed and grow. Smart immigration policy protects our borders while ensuring America remains the destination for all those willing to work hard and dream big.

Moving major issues requires action, not rhetoric, and today the Administration took a step towards breaking the Washington logjam on immigration that has hamstrung our economy and made America less competitive in the global marketplace.

Here are more comments from NYC and NY politicians:

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand: "I was deeply disappointed when the DREAM Act was filibustered on the Senate floor. It was a missed opportunity to allow tens of thousands of young people who grew up here and know only America as their home to make a contribution to our country’s military and economy. These young people deserve better and I commend President Obama for taking action today. They deserve a chance at the American dream - to work hard, get a good education, serve in the military, earn their way to legal status, help grow our economy and keep our country safe. Now it’s time for Congress to put politics and ideology aside and strengthen our nation’s future and national security by finally passing the DREAM Act."

Public Advocate Bill de Blasio: "The children of immigrants hold in their hands the hopes of their families and the future of this country. This is as true today as it was when my grandmother and grandfather came here from Italy. Legal status does not change the fact that these young people are Americans—and we all have a stake in seeing them succeed. Against the backdrop of our broken immigration policies, the end of these deportations represents real hope and progress. I applaud President Obama for his leadership in creating new opportunity for countless young people."

Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer: "I am greatly pleased by President Obama’s announcement this afternoon that he will give work permits to thousands of immigrants who came to the United States as children, and who will be safe from deportation as a result of this far-sighted policy. The President’s new directive, which affects an estimated 800,000 people, is a long overdue step on the road to full freedom and equality for immigrants who work hard every day and play a constructive role in our diverse society. It offers them a dignified path to employment and a freedom from the fear that they might be whisked off the streets and deported at any moment. America has long been a beacon for people around the world who want to start new lives in a land of opportunity--and the President’s announcement today continues that proud tradition."

Assemblyman Francisco Moya: "I am greatly pleased by President Obama’s announcement this afternoon that he will give work permits to thousands of immigrants who came to the United States as children, and who will be safe from deportation as a result of this far-sighted policy. The President’s new directive, which affects an estimated 800,000 people, is a long overdue step on the road to full freedom and equality for immigrants who work hard every day and play a constructive role in our diverse society. It offers them a dignified path to employment and a freedom from the fear that they might be whisked off the streets and deported at any moment. America has long been a beacon for people around the world who want to start new lives in a land of opportunity--and the President’s announcement today continues that proud tradition."