A day after Dominique Strauss-Kahn was freed from house arrest without bail because the rape charges against him are "on the verge of collapse," sources "close to the defense investigation" are telling the Post that his accuser is a prostitute. "There is information…of her getting extraordinary tips, if you know what I mean," the classy source tells the family newspaper, "and it's not for bringing extra f*cking towels."

In addition to her cleaning duties, the accuser was allegedly "collecting cash on the side from male guests" at the Sofitel. The sources claim that she was part of a larger prostitution racket that placed her in a top-dollar hotel due to her possible earning capabilities. "When you're a chambermaid at Local 6, when you first get into the US, you start at the motels at JFK," the source says. "You don't start at the Sofitel. There's a whole squad of people who saw her as an earner."

These assertions (which seem to crop up in high profile rape cases) come as the Manhattan DA's office reels from inconsistencies, lies, and illegal activity that have come to light regarding the accuser, and have combined to jeopardize the case. In addition to lying on her application for asylum from Guinea, lying about being gang-raped in Guinea, and declaring a friend's child on a tax return, the Times reports the details of a phone call she made 28 hours after she came forward with her accusations. Despite being made on May 15, the call was not translated until Wednesday.

Speaking in a "unique dialect of Fulani," to a boyfriend in an Arizona immigration jail, the woman's words were roughly translated as, "Don't worry, this guy has a lot of money. I know what I'm doing." Despite initially claiming that her only source of income was the Sofitel, authorities found bank records "showing deposits of thousands of dollars in Arizona, Georgia, New York, and Pennsylvania" in her name. This left her lawyer, who has defended her story and character amidst these revelations, "speechless."

Initially seen as a "very pious, devout Muslim woman," she is now being called "a prostitute." Regardless of the blows her credibility has taken, the forensic evidence in the case—the semen found in the room and on her shirt—is very real, as are the charges of rape that Strauss-Kahn still faces. Cyrus Vance, Jr. and the rest of the Manhattan DA's office face an uphill battle to convince a jury to keep questions of credibility in context, and secure a conviction based on the merits of the case.