Photographer Allen Henson caused a bit of a scene outside the New York Supreme Court on Centre Street yesterday afternoon when he showed up accompanied by five models who proceeded to remove their tops and then pose for photos on the courthouse steps. In an interview last night, Henson deemed both his self-created circus and his legal troubles "completely fucking ludicrous—it was awesome."

Henson, as you may recall, photographs models—usually topless and always beautiful—out in public, at restaurants, with NYPD officers, and atop the Empire State Building. Earlier this month, the landmark skyscraper's attorney sought to have Henson barred from the building, after Henson posted on Facebook, "CASTING: looking for a model who isn't afraid of heights in NYC," accompanied by one of his Empire State Building photos.

The Empire State Building is suing Henson for $1.1 million and claims his photographs are putting its reputation as a "safe and secure family and tourist attraction" at risk. Henson countersued, and he told us, "It's embarrassing for America... They are saying breasts have made their building unsafe?!"

"Censorship is important to me, it's upsetting to me," Henson said. "I did two tours in Iraq and I live and breathe America. We should be able to do these things and not worry about these frivolous lawsuits." It is legal for women to expose their breasts in public in New York state, though the NYPD sometimes needs a reminder. The Empire State Building, of course, is private property, and they have their own rules.

Henson's hearing was actually postponed until August 4, but he went to the court, models in tow, anyway. The Daily News reports, "In the lobby, a leggy blonde in his group started undressing and was quickly admonished by security, along with Henson, who was taking unauthorized video and photos." One bystander reportedly sneered, "That’s an insult to the court."

Henson said that a court officer or security guard asked him for his phone and told him, "I need to see your phone, I need you to delete these." He refused, telling her that she could subpoena the phone, but "the photos are my property." He claims the guard then noticed other photographers around and asked who they were, and when he explained they were photographers from newspapers like the Post, "[The guard] changed her attitude and said she had to called her supervisor." Henson said her reversal upon realizing there were reporters present "blew me away."

Henson, who just completed a book of his photographs, shrugs off insinuations that he brought the models to the courthouse for publicity, and suggests that it's the Empire State Building that's seeking publicity. "I went to 1 World Trade Center, it's a beautiful and breathtaking," Henson said. "I have a feeling the Empire State Building is feeling the pinch. They're not the biggest building in town anymore."

As for the Empire State Building's attempt to ban him from the building, he said he doesn't even use the same model twice, let alone shoot the same building. "I've moved on," Henson declared. "It doesn't seem like they have."