Last week, a Brooklyn woman's Instagram post about seeing a man masturbating on a 3 train—and the inconsiderate treatment she got from an MTA worker—went viral. Now, the man has been arrested—after allegedly flashing another subway rider!

Reggie Frank, 44, was charged with public lewdness for the 3 train incident. WCBS 2 reports, "Frank was also to be charged in a second incident on Tuesday at the Union Square station, where he allegedly exposed himself to another woman on a train. He was arrested a short time after that incident, sources told CBS2."

Tiffany Jackson posted images of a man who was masturbating on the subway to Instagram (the post was deleted, probably because it's NSFW; here's a NSFW screengrab), partly to call attention to the pervert but also to lament the actions of the subway conductor she went to after getting out at Nevins Street, "He rolled his eyes, annoyed, and radioed dispatch... The conductor grumbled and told me to just go upstairs and report the incident to the booth."

However, there wasn't a token booth on her side of the station, and she says that as she tried to find it, the masturbator was following her. So Jackson fled the station and turned to social media, explaining that she was "not upset about jerk-off guy, there are creeps all over this city. I’m more upset how the MTA handled themselves...They acted like I was more of a nuisance than trying to help me, and sent me right in the path of danger."

Now that Frank has been arrested, Jackson told the Daily News, "He seemed like a pro at this. I’m just happy he was caught."

The MTA said it was reviewing the incident after Jackson's post became widely read; CBS 2 adds, "A transit source said the conductor did radio the rail control center to report the incident. Also, while there is no booth on the Manhattan-bound side of the Nevins Street station, there is a callbox Jackson could have used." Right—because a callbox is exactly what you want to use when a subway pervert appears to be following you.

If you see someone masturbating, flashing or committing other indecent acts, the MTA's website has a place for riders to report subway misconduct and even a place for riders to submit images.