Sunday was the warmest New York City Marathon since the 1990s, according to race day weather reports, with temperatures at the finish line in Central Park in the low 70s.

That didn’t bother Evans Chebet from Kenya who won the men's race with a time of 2 hours, eight minutes and 41 seconds. He was 13 seconds ahead of Shura Kitata, from Ethiopia.

Evans Chebet wins the 2022 TCS New York City Marathon.

The world champion long distance runner, Brazilian Daniel Do Nascimento, 24, collapsed before finishing. He was at the 21st mile.

Sharon Lokedi from Kenya won the women's race. It was her first marathon and she finished in two hours, 23 minutes and 23 seconds.

Marcel Hug of Switzerland took the men's wheelchair race for the fifth time, smashing the course record, and tied Kurt Fearnley for most men's wheelchair race wins. Susannah Scaroni won in the women's wheelchair race.

Second place Abdi Nageeye of Netherlands, winner Evans Chebet of Kenya, and third place Shura Kitata of Ethiopia pose on the podium.

Organizers expected 50,000 runners on Sunday.

In Sunset Park, former Moroccan runner Hafid El-Idrissi, 49 was there to support “my African brothers and older runners in general.” He had a table of mint tea set up along the course and was blasting Gnawa music on a speaker connected to his iPhone.

“I tell my friends in the morning, it's addictive to run,” he said. “I want to let them know I’m here for them.”

Everyone's cheering for everybody. It's just like a good, happy New York scene.
Emily Lehman of Bay Ridge, Brooklyn

Emily Lehman from Bay Ridge, Brooklyn was out with her two small children, cheering for the runners.

"There's such a good vibe out here, there's so many people, there's great music,” Lehman said. “Everyone's cheering for everybody. It's just like a good, happy New York scene."

French resident Mikael Grezes was on the sidelines to cheer for his wife, who had planned to run in 2020 when the race was canceled for the pandemic. He said the best thing about running in New York are the New Yorkers. In France when they run races he said people on the subway give them strange looks.

“They ask why are you running? Here in New York people when I took the ferry with my wife this morning everyone was cheering, approaching, it’s quite different,” Grezes said. “Here the commitment for the sport and the people, it’s quite good.”

He said his wife gave up beer for the past month for the race, but planned to celebrate with a cold one after she finished.