As disgraced movie producer Harvey Weinstein's criminal trial begins jury selection in NYC this week, the mogul faces additional criminal charges unsealed in Los Angeles just hours after Weinstein appeared in a Manhattan court. Los Angeles DA Jackie Lacey announced today that Weinstein has been charged with "raping one woman and sexually assaulting another in separate incidents over a two-day period in 2013."

In a statement, Lacey said Weinstein "used his power and influence to gain access to his victims and then commit violent crimes against them." He's accused of forcing his way into an unnamed woman's hotel room in February 2013 and raping her, and sexually assaulting another woman in her Beverly Hills hotel suite the following evening.

The new LA criminal charges come as the mogul's publicist Juda Engelmayer is reportedly drawing attention to a 57-page presentation of opposition research—"The Proper Narrative for Addressing the Harvey Weinstein Case"—against Weinstein's accusers.

The oppo research from "stakeholders of various sorts" comes as the former producer's criminal trial began on Monday, more than two years after the groundbreaking reports that accused Weinstein of sexual misconduct, leading to more than 80 women to come forward about varying accounts of sexual abuse.

The trial is expected to last more than two months, according to the Office of Court Administration. Jury selection begins Tuesday.

"Today, Lady Justice is standing down a super predator. You," Rose McGowan, one of Weinstein's accusers, said at a press conference ahead of the hearing Monday morning. "You have only yourself to blame."

"You thought you could terrorize me and others into silence. You were wrong," McGowan said.

Rose McGowan speaks at a press conference on the first day of disgraced movie producer Harvey Weinstein's criminal trial.

Rose McGowan and other Silence Breakers speaking at a press conference Monday morning.

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Rose McGowan and other Silence Breakers speaking at a press conference Monday morning.
Gothamist/Gwynne Hogan

In the opening day, the Manhattan District Attorney's office confirmed that the judge will block Weinstein's lawyers from calling on Detective Nicholas DiGaudio, who allegedly withheld evidence favorable to Weinstein from prosecutors. The Times reports Weinstein's team had hoped to call on the detective, who was accused of telling one of Weinstein's accusers she could delete messages from her phone before handing it to prosecutors.

The judge also told Weinstein's team to "leave the witnesses alone," though the judge denied an outright ban on them publicly discussing the case, known as a gag order request. Per the DA's office, Assistant District Attorney Joan Illuzzi-Orbon called the defense counsel's behavior "abominable" for speaking about "witnesses in a degrading way," referencing when Weinstein attorney Donna Rotunno implied a witness was a liar in a CNN interview.

Engelmayer did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the trial, the judge's ruling or the presentation he reportedly released with opposition research against his accusers.

Despite the dozens of women coming forward to accuse Weinstein of sexual miconduct and assault, the legal case rests on two women's charges: accusations of forcing oral sex onto a woman in 2006 and another incident in 2013 in which he allegedly raped a woman in Manhattan. He faces five charges of predatory sexual assault, a criminal sexual act and rape.

A third accusation–in which Lucia Evans said Weinstein had forced her to perform oral sex on him in 2004—was dropped in October 2018.

Though the accusations are numerous, evidence presented in court often differs from what's made public in news reports. Criminal defense lawyer Mark A. Bederow told the Times, "I can't think of another case where the defendant comes into trial at a larger disadvantage in terms of perception," though he added that "evidence in the courtroom very often is not the evidence that appears in the public realm."

In 2015, Weinstein avoided criminal charges after Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance declined to prosecute Weinstein for allegedly groping a model in New York City, despite a recording in which he seems to admit to it.

Allegations exposed in the New York Times and New Yorker in October 2017 have since spurred the global Me Too movement against sexual violence. Weinstein's patterns of abuse have been detailed by countless women, notably, the Silence Breakers, a group of women who went public about Weinstein's abusive behavior that had been considered an open secret in Hollywood.

Lauren Sivan, a former News 12 reporter who says Weinstein masturbated into a potted plant in front of her, said, "It's kind of awful to be known for something that happened to you because you accidentally sat next to a predator at a dinner party."

"This is a dangerous predator," Sivan told reporters. "Even if he is acquitted in this trial let's hope that he's never able to go back to doing what he was doing."

Last month, more than 30 women who've accused Weinstein of sexual misconduct and abuse reached a $25 million settlement, closing out many of the lawsuits filed against him. The former producer's bail was recently increased after prosecutors said he had tampered with an ankle bracelet monitor, though the charges haven't stopped him from enjoying New York City's nightlife.

He has been seen going into court using a walker, and his lawyer recently told judges his spinal injuries following a car crash were "too much to bear" to deal with a $45 million civil lawsuit amid the criminal trial. In a recent interview with the Post, he complained about feeling like the "forgotten man," touting how much he has helped women's movie careers.

"The world is watching," said actress and comedian Sarah Ann Masse, who accused Weinstein of hugging her in his underwear while she interviewed to be a nanny for his children. "This trial shows that abusers will be held accountable despite their attempts to keep the abuse behind closed doors."

With reporting from WNYC producer Gwynne Hogan.