Trying to stem the tide of pixelated flesh that flickers on the America's portable devices is like stopping Logjammin' half way through: pointless and unsatisfying. That doesn't mean some people won't try, like Dawn Hawkins, the executive director of Morality In Media who is launching a campaign to force airlines to adopt a no-pornography policy after she sat near a man watching S&M on his iPad. "I couldn't believe people didn't care that someone was watching pornography in public," Hawkins told the Times. "I couldn't believe society has come to this," she added, as tens of thousands of Syrians fled their homes in the midst of a civil war and society tries to grapple with the senseless shootings in Colorado.

Thankfully, the posture of "don't we have more important things to worry about?" is shared by many people, including San Francisco cafe owner Bruce Ponte, who has observed some of his patrons looking at nude photos. "This is an Internet cafe. People come here to surf. Am I supposed to do something about that?" Ponte does draw the line somewhere: loud cellphone talkers. "They're bothering everybody."

Some libraries have taken to putting shields over their computers (which may not be a bad idea for New York) and while Delta Airlines prohibits "offensive material" on their flights, a spokesperson says there's a "gray area" when it comes to enforcing the rule on a case-by-case basis. As is the case with pulling out a Hustler on the bus or clipping our nails on the subway, it's up to us to not be oblivious assholes in public. After Hawkins posted this video of her account of the S&M incident, she said she received a torrent of angry emails. "People said, 'Just look away.' Their argument is that people can do what they want. This is America." Well said.