We receive a lot of e-mail. Most of these missives are carefully read, discussed at length among the editors, and courteously replied to in a timely fashion—except for the ones that are so bizarre and irrelevant that we're simply afraid to engage the sender. Instead, we'll share them with you. Behold, the eccentric underbelly of the Gothamist inbox:

This came to us with the subject line "Stroller":

Hello, My Name is [REDACTED].I want single Stroller.Do you carry them and what is the price?Also what types sizes of Stroller you carry and what would be the price?Please advice.

We don't sell our signature Gothamist PlaytimePerambulators® ("Now With 22% Less Lead Paint!") to just anyone. Making sure that our strollers find a good home, where grammar and usage are respected is crucial in determining whether or not to sell a stroller. We're fresh out of "single" strollers anyway but have plenty of the Octomom Edition.

Constructive criticism comes in many forms, in this instance, under the subject line "SHIT":

YOU SHOULD START WRITING FOR SOME SOAP OPERA MAGAZINE AGENCY OR SOMETHING. THIS IS NOT AN ARTICLE, FIRST PARAGRAPH, HOW RUDE AND NASTY, I DIDN’T EVEN BOTHER TO READ MORE. I LOOKED FOR A PLACE THEN I CAN EXPRESS MY COMMENT ABOUT YOUR HORRIBLE NOTE OF WRITING. YOU SHOULD QUIT THIS JOB AND LOOK FOR SOMETHING ELSE. YOU ARE NOT A WRITER. YOU CANT EVEN WRITE FOR YOUR MOMA.

Writing for Soap Opera Digest is actually quite difficult. You spend most of your time making spreadsheets to keep track of all the comas—season-ending comas, surprise comas, affair-facilitating comas, comas-within-comas—it's a mess. Writing for the Museum of Modern Art is way easier (less comas) but writing for a Soap Opera Magazine Agency? Keep dreaming! Maybe after our sixth Pulitzer.

This hit the inbox when we were feeling particularly nostalgic:

Is this email still good. I went to college with you [REDACTED]

[REDACTED], oh my God is that you? It's been ages you look fantastic! How's Tabitha? That boating accident sounded pretty rough. Remember when we had the rest of our lives ahead of us, [REDACTED]? Remember when we drank strawberry wine and stayed up all night talking? We sure lived, loved, and laughed! When you're young, everything feels like the end of the world; but it's not, it's just the beginning. Zach Efron said that in a movie but I feel that it sums up those feelings we had pretty nicely. See you at Homecoming!