Ugh. With dew point temperatures in the lower 70s the humidity has been at almost debilitating levels this morning. It's not just on the ground, the lowest couple miles of the atmosphere is near saturation. All that moisture will only need a slight disturbance to produce prodigious precipitation amounts, and it just started pouring outside Gothamist HQ.

The National Weather Service has just issued a flash flood warning for parts of Brooklyn and Manhattan:


* AT 1057 AM EDT...DOPPLER RADAR INDICATED A THUNDERSTORM PRODUCING
HEAVY RAIN ACROSS THE WARNED AREA. UP TO ONE INCH OF RAIN HAS
ALREADY FALLEN ACCORDING TO DOPPLER RADAR WITHIN 30 MINUTES. FLASH
FLOODING IS EXPECTED TO BEGIN SHORTLY.

* SOME LOCATIONS THAT WILL EXPERIENCE FLOODING INCLUDE...
FLATBUSH...CROWN HEIGHTS...LOWER EAST SIDE...BENSONHURST...
SHEEPSHEAD BAY...PARK SLOPE...EAST VILLAGE...SOHO...BROOKLYN
HEIGHTS AND GREENPOINT.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

MOVE TO HIGHER GROUND NOW. ACT QUICKLY TO PROTECT YOUR LIFE.

TURN AROUND...DONT DROWN WHEN ENCOUNTERING FLOODED ROADS. MOST FLOOD DEATHS OCCUR IN VEHICLES.

We can expect more showers and thunderstorms this afternoon as a cold front arrives. Some of those slow-moving storms could produce heavy rain and localized flooding. This afternoon's high will stick to the lower 80s under the heavy cloud cover.

The humidity near the ground will break once the cold front passes but the chance of showers and thunderstorms will last until about 9 p.m. That might make for a dramatic sunset. Real humidity relief will come tomorrow when the skies will be clear and high will only reach the low 80s.

More dry weather is expected on Friday but it is back to unsettled weather for the weekend as once again a front is expected to stall somewhere nearby, allowing upper level disturbances to churn up lots of clouds and periods of rain. Saturday and Sunday should warm to the mid 80s with a chance of afternoon showers or thunderstorms. More humidity, more showers, and temperatures reaching the mid to upper 80s are likely for much of next week for what is normally the peak of the annual temperature curve.