The Long Island Rail Road's newly opened Atlantic Terminal Pavilion was decades in the making, and as such, the builders want to make sure it stands the test of time. So they surrounded it with "14 massive coffin-shaped concrete-and-granite bollards to ward off potential, though unspecified, terror attacks," according to the Brooklyn Paper.

Outside the glitzy $108-million terminal — where passengers can walk through a naturally lit atrium to transfer between LIRR trains and 10 subway lines — the hunks of stone take up a chunk of the sidewalk and block views, according to Councilwoman Letitia James (D-Fort Greene). "The coffins are ugly," she said. "This is a facility that is supposed to celebrate openness, yet they put hideous barricades in front of it." Long Island Rail Road President Helena Williams agreed that the bollards aren't pretty, but said they are needed "in this day and age." She added: "We worked with the NYPD and the MTA police, who assess the risks and tell us what kind of security we need. Do these bollards lack elegance? Yes. But they are necessary."

Architect John di Domenico said the initial plan was for "a group of low benches," but but they were made bulkier after construction began because "[s]ecurity concerns kept increasing." In an opinion piece and a video, the paper takes a stand against the structures, arguing that "train stations are supposed to be about magic and adventure, not paranoia and fear." Passersby like East New York resident Jason Russell were equally peeved by the bollards. “It looks like a Greek ritual ground," he said. "It seems like it’s just taking up space for no reason.” Meanwhile, the folks over at No Land Grab and Atlantic Yards Report find it bizarre that NYPD security experts determined that the train station needs to be defended by the bollards, but the arena component of Bruce Ratner's nearby Atlantic Yards project doesn't.