A bill introduced in the City Council on Wednesday would require the NYPD to conduct sensitivity training to help beat cops better respond to victims of sexual assault and harassment on the street. The legislation, sponsored by Brooklyn Council Member Laurie Cumbo, is a direct response to one precinct commander's implication that date rape is less serious than stranger rape.

In a January interview, Captain Peter Rose, the head of the 94th Precinct in Greenpoint, appeared to try to downplay the severity of the rise in sexual assaults and attempted sexual assaults in his precinct from eight in 2015 to 13 in 2016. "Some of them were Tinder, some of them were hookup sites, some of them were actually coworkers. It's not a trend that we're too worried about because out of 13 [sex attacks], only two were true stranger rapes," Rose told DNAInfo.

Rose reiterated this opinion during a community council hearing, saying that the reported assaults weren't "total abomination rapes where strangers are being dragged off the streets. If there's a true stranger rape, a random guy picks up a stranger off the street, those are the troubling ones. That person has, like, no moral standards."

Rose later apologized for his comments, saying that he "deeply regretted" his characterization of rape. But advocates with the National Organization for Women said the apology didn't cut it. They protested outside of the precinct, calling for a "top-to-bottom overhaul of how rape cases are handled by the police."

Last fall, the 94th Precinct was criticized for what local women deemed a lax response to an uptick in reported rapes. "What I am getting from a lot of people, and it's a lot of females, is that the 94th Precinct doesn't do anything," said Debbie Tenney, a longtime resident, at the time.

Cumbo's proposed training—the contours of which aren't included in the legislation —would be part of the police academy for all new recruits; all officers in the department would also receive updated training every two years. While detectives currently receive such training, other NYPD officers do not, according to Politico.

Overall crime rates are trending down under Mayor de Blasio, but reports of rape are on the rise.

Cumbo stressed in a comment to Gothamist that she did not believe Roses's remarks "reflect the entire police force." However, she said, "When these acts of crime are minimized, either by words or actions, we are blatantly overlooking the needs and protection of women, LGBTQ and non-conforming individuals, who are most often victimized."

Mayoral spokesman Austin Finan said that his office is reviewing the legislation. "The NYPD takes seriously victims of sexual assault and harassment and is committed to honing best practices concerning its interactions with the public and its handling of complaints related to these crimes," he said.