After reports of people using the LinkNYC kiosks to view pornand masturbating in public—LinkNYC has decided to pull the plug on web browsing. The company said, "Starting today, we are removing web browsing on all Link tablets while we work with the City and community to explore potential solutions, like time limits."

The 400 kiosks across three boroughs, which offer super-fast WiFi, USB outlets for charging and a tablet for free Internet access, were rolled out early this year and hailed as a way to meet the public demand for fast WiFi, information, and viral videos. But the kiosks' debut has been overshadowed by incidents involving homeless people allegedly squatting by and hogging kiosks.

In a statement, LinkNYC acknowledged "that some users have been monopolizing the Link tablets and using them inappropriately, preventing others from being able to use them while frustrating the residents and businesses around them. The kiosks were never intended for anyone’s extended, personal use and we want to ensure that Links are accessible and a welcome addition to New York City neighborhoods."

However, the company promises that "other tablet features—free phone calls, maps, device charging, and access to 311 and 911—will continue to work as they did before, and nothing is changing about LinkNYC’s superfast Wi-Fi. As planned, we will continue to improve the Link experience and add new features for people to enjoy while they’re on the go." LinkNYC added that nearly 475,000 individuals have used it "and they have used it more than 21 million times. We’ve heard from New Yorkers who use the Links to save data on their mobile plans, call relatives across the the country, and get a much-needed quick charge."

LinkNYC is asking for feedback—you can email hello@link.nyc.

Update: A spokesperson from Mayor Bill de Blasio's office said, "There were concerns about loitering and extended use of LinkNYC kiosks, so the Mayor is addressing these quality-of-life complaints head on. Removing the internet browser from LinkNYC tablets will not affect the other great services LinkNYC provides - superfast Wi-Fi, free phone calls, or access to key City services - but will address concerns we’ve heard from our fellow New Yorkers."

Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. is happy with this move, calling them "positive adjustments":

“We’ve heard a great deal of concern from all corners of the city about the misuse of these kiosks for lewd and nefarious purposes, and today’s announcement that web browsing services will be disabled on LinkNYC kiosks is a step in the right direction. These kiosks and the connectivity they provide are key to bridging the digital divide in our city, and we must ensure that a handful of less-than-wholesome users do not threaten the success of the entire enterprise. Disabling web browsing will prevent the most objectionable uses of these kiosks and make our streets safer, while also preserving the best parts of the LinkNYC service."