Following a very public dispute, a 9/11 charity has announced that its annual stair climb will be at 1 World Trade Center. The Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers Foundation announced the climb will take place on the morning of Sunday, May 15th—with a new finish line.

The group said, "While last year's climb went to the 90th floor of One World Trade Center, which was still under construction, this year the climb will finish at One World Observatory, with its breathtaking views of New York, on the 102nd floor. One World Observatory is located at One World Trade Center."

Because the event is limited to 1000 stair-climbers, the foundation is urging those wishing to join in the celebration at the renowned One World Observatory to register as soon as possible. To do so, they should go to: tunnel2towers.org

Last month, the non-profit said that the Durst Organization, which co-owns 1 WTC with the Port Authority, had led them to believe they could hold the event there again, before changing its mind.

A Durst spokesman explained, "As we learned from last year's event, the unique design and security requirement of One World Trade Center make stair-climbs extraordinarily challenging. With more tenants, the logistics are even more complex this year." But the charity involved NY Governor Andrew Cuomo and NJ Governor Chris Christie; since Christie was held hostage, Cuomo stepped in, saying he was "confident that remaining issues will be resolved so the event can happen again this year."

The charity was formed in honor of Stephen Siller, a firefighter who just finished his shift in Park Slope when the planes hit the World Trade Center on September 11th. In spite of being off duty, he drove to Manhattan and found Brooklyn Battery Tunnel was closed to cars. So he carried 60 pounds of gear and ran through the tunnel. Siller was was seen last at West Street. The charity, headed by his brother Frank, organizes charity 5K runs as well as raises money for loved ones of first responders; in 2014, they paid off the mortgages of the homes owned by two slain NYPD officers.