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A Look At The Unfamiliar Ingredients That Make Filipino Food So Extraordinary

Chef King Phojanakong at his restaurant, Kuma Inn </br>

Clay Williams / Gothamist

Phojanakong preparing the pig's blood for his dinuguan, a pork blood stew </br>

Clay Williams / Gothamist

Browning sliced pork belly for the dinuguan </br>

Clay Williams / Gothamist


Sauteing the ingredients for Pancit Canton, a stir-fried noodle dish </br>

Clay Williams / Gothamist

Phojanakong tamping down a flare up </br>

Clay Williams / Gothamist

The dinuguan has finished simmering, and takes on a rich, brown color </br>

Clay Williams / Gothamist


Pancit Canton, a Cantonese-style stir fry </br>

Clay Williams / Gothamist

Chef Miguel Trinidad at Jeepney, boiling Sun noodles for Pancit Isabela </br>

Clay Williams / Gothamist

Pork shoulder coming out of the oven at Jeepney </br>

Clay Williams / Gothamist

Trinidad plating the noodles for Pancit Isabela </br>

Clay Williams / Gothamist

Pouring broth onto the Pancit Isabela, a Filipino-style ramen dish </br>

Clay Williams / Gothamist

Adobo Dilaw, made with turmeric, star anise, clove, and cinnamon, at Jeepney </br>

Clay Williams / Gothamist


Balut, a fertilized duck egg, at Jeepney </br>

Clay Williams / Gothamist

Johnny Air, a Filipino shipping company, and trusted market for Filipino food products </br>

Clay Williams / Gothamist