By Saturday, the second-to-last piece Banksy put up in NYC—a big cat across from Yankee Stadium in The Bronx—had been completely painted over.

It was another reminder that few remaining pieces from Banksy's incredibly fun Better Out Than In open air exhibit probably won't be around much longer. But you don't have to take a trip to the police evidence locker or pay $615K to see some of them. Below, find out which pieces are still around.

What's left of Banksy:

  • Chelsea Dog Peeing Stencil, located on 6th Avenue and 24th Street in Manhattan. This one has tags all around it, but it's mostly in good condition (except the speech bubble).
  • The Tribeca Towers, located at Staple Street in Manhattan. Covered in plexiglass and available for viewing.
  • The Williamsburg Geishas, located at Cook Street and Graham Avenue in Brooklyn. Covered with plexiglass and rolling gates; viewable between specific times or whenever the owners feel comfortable rolling the gates up.
  • The Upper West Side Hammer Boy, located on West 79th Street in Manhattan. Covered in plexiglass and available for viewing.
  • The South Bronx "Ghetto For Life," located on 153rd Street in The Bronx. Covered with plexiglass and rolling gates; viewable between specific times or whenever the owners feel comfortable rolling the gates up.
  • The Coney Island Robot, located on Stillwell and Neptune Avenue in Brooklyn. Covered with plexiglass and rolling gates; viewable between specific times or whenever the owners feel comfortable rolling the gates up.

There are a few more that are still around, but they have either been badly defaced or almost fully gone:

  • East New York Beaver, located on Bradford and Pitkin Street in Brooklyn. Still up, but quite defaced.
  • The Woodside Eternity, located at 69th Street and 39th Avenue in Queens. Still up, mostly defaced.
  • Chelsea NY Accent, located on 25th Street between 10th and 11th Avenues in Manhattan. This one has been defaced over and over again, to the point that someone has made a new stencil of it and sprayed it right over the original. Most recently, part of it was whitewashed, leaving just the "This is.."
  • Greenpoint Blocked Message, located on Noble Street in Brooklyn. The message has silver paint over it, but with the right light, you can still make out some of the letters.

Of course, some of these pieces may disappear forever tomorrow, so take all this with a grain of salt (and let us know if one of them is gone). Lastly, a special thanks to Nic Garcia, Robert Dunning and Scott Lynch for all their help scavenging and photographing during the month of Banksy.