Stephen Colbert started off Friday night's show with a very sober, powerful monologue about the horrific shooting at an Oregon community college this week. "I can't pretend that it didn't happen; I also can't pretend to know what to do to prevent what happened yesterday and all the times it has happened before. But I think pretending is part of the problem," Colbert said in a piece that had shades of Jon Stewart's remarks after the South Carolina church shooting earlier this summer. "These things happen over and over again and we're naturally horrified and shocked when we hear about them, but then we change nothing, and we pretend that it won't happen again."

Watch it below.

Here are his full remarks:

I want to talk about pretending. That is something I know a little bit about. I pretended to be a certain person, and to feel a certain way for almost 10 years. And now, I am supposedly not pretending every night, though occasionally I am pretending to know what I'm doing out here...

Whether or not we hit the right notes on any given night, I think that the least that we can do is not pretend to always know what to do or say, and in the face of the killings in Oregon yesterday I honestly don't know what to do or say, other than our hearts are broken for the people struck by this senseless tragedy. And I don't know how to start a show like this, which is often about whatever happened in the last 24 hours. I can't pretend that it didn't happen; I also can't pretend to know what to do to prevent what happened yesterday and all the times it has happened before. But I think pretending is part of the problem.

These things happen over and over again and we're naturally horrified and shocked when we hear about them, but then we change nothing, and we pretend that it won't happen again. Some say the answer is stricter gun laws; others say the answer is mental health care, that we need better treatment or just keep the guns out of the hands of the insane. Maybe it's both, I honestly don't know. But I do know that one of the definitions of insanity is changing nothing and then pretending that something will change.

Colbert then pivoted into a discussion of the "honest insanity" that is Donald Trump. And Colbert got mighty honest about the "egomaniacal billionaire," saying, "Mr. Trump, to answer your call for political honesty, I just want to say: You're not going to be President," Colbert said. "There is zero chance we'll be seeing you being sworn in on the Capitol steps with your hand on a giant golden Bible."