Photographer Allen Henson has been locked in a legal battle with the Empire State Building ever since he took a series of nude shots at the top of the skyscraper in 2013. The case was finally settled this week, with the ESB agreeing to drop the $1.1 million suit as long as Henson stays out of the building forever.

Henson told us he viewed the settlement as a victory for nude rights: "This is a victory for artists, a victory for women, this is a victory for New York," he said. "The ESRT came after me, they never had anything." And even if Henson can't personally make good on his desire to do another topless photoshoot at the ESB, he encouraged other photographers to do so: "We won. Photographers of NY, the Empire is free game."

By @joninnewyork #fuckyou a tattoo I got in Puerto Rico / fixed by @rabbits999

A photo posted by ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀Allen Henson (@allenhenson) on

The ESB owners said in a statement: "The Empire State Building is private property and will always enforce the rules governing all building visitors, which are designed to ensure a safe, family-friendly experience for everyone. Mr. Henson's actions have rendered him permanently barred from entering the Empire State Building."

Henson is notorious for photographing topless models around NYC, including at restaurants, with NYPD officers, and even in front of the Manhattan court house. The ESB claimed that Henson's photos put its reputation as a "safe and secure family and tourist attraction" at risk. Henson countersued, telling us at the time, "It's embarrassing for America... They are saying breasts have made their building unsafe?!"

In addition to plugging his photography book Editorial On The Rocks, Henson told the Post he will release limited edition prints of the 2013 ESB shoot soon.