(Courtesy of Jen Chung)

From what I've gathered from a handful of millennials, Pokémon Go is an augmented reality game that makes people stare at their phones instead of experience Real Life™. Just what we needed! If you aren't informed about this latest thing, congratulations, and here's a quick summary: the app makes players go outside and walk around while looking at their phone, and when they see a cartoon figure on their screen they "catch" it.

Is there "winning" in Pokémon Go? No, you are not winning on any level by playing this game. While completing the Pokedex would be considered an impressive accomplishment by nerds around the world, there are an infinite number of individual Pokémon you could catch, all within the 150 types included in the game, so it can go on forever. You will never win at the game, or at life, by staring at your phone. Just look at this disturbing clip, which we've confirmed is not from the upcoming season of Black Mirror. It was filmed in Central Park Monday morning, which has "basically been HQ for Pokemon GO," uploader Jonathan Perez notes.

*Shudders*

While it's troubling on a societal level, it's also potentially dangerous, falling under the "distracted walking" problem we encounter on our sidewalks every goddamn day—just check out the footage!

Last year a survey came out regarding texting & walking—which is probably safer than Pokémon Go-ing & walking—with findings pointing to distracted walkers being a “serious” issue worldwide. In 2013, another study was released finding that "emergency department hospital visits for injuries involving distracted pedestrians on cell phones more than doubled between 2004 and 2010." And finally, "the National Safety Council report estimated that distracted-walking incidents involving cellphones accounted for 11,101 injuries from 2000 through 2011," which the NY Post pointed to during their reporting on New Jersey's aim to make the act illegal earlier this year. How long before someone falls into a 9/11 Memorial Pool?

And while you're at it, the NYPD's 19th Precinct would like to remind you that Pokémon Go & driving is also dangerous:

They aren't the only one issuing warnings regarding the craze, police departments around the country have also issued warnings—in New Jersey, one department posted on Facebook:

"There have been several reports throughout the country concerning accidents and injuries from children and adolescents walking around, solely focused on their wireless devices and not realizing what is taking place around them. There have been pedestrians struck, vehicle accidents, and personal injuries due to falls. There was also a specific case in Missouri where several individuals were robbed after utilizing the interactive game to lure victims to an area that had in-game items that attracted young players. Around Park Ridge, we have also seen large groups congregating near busy roadways, while on their devices playing the game. Although this is a game that encourages people to get outside and walk around, we would be remiss if we did not mention the associated risks and concerns. Please talk to your children on how to play the game in a safe environment, away from roadways and traffic, all while staying aware of their surroundings."

Aside from personal injuries (it's already landed at least one person in the ER), others have warned about the personal security risks, pedophiles using the game to lure young victims, and one man warned that it's unsafe for black men.

UPDATE: The MTA has also issued a warning about playing the game too close to the subway tracks.