In the aftermath of our jarring return to Standard Time, darkness is enveloping the city ever-earlier, causing widespread SADs on Twitter. But yesterday we were blessed with a burst of colorful compensation to balance out the gloom: shortly after lunch New Yorkers were enraptured by a glorious magical enchanting transcendent sunset, seemingly hand-painted by the immortal soul of Bob Ross as a divine gift for millions of Instagram users.

Work in Gothamist HQ paused as we embraced each other quietly by the windows overlooking the Manhattan Bridge. "Kind of makes you think," Jake said after a long, contemplative silence. "It just keeps getting better and better," Nell whispered in awe, as the sky swirled into increasingly Fauvist shades of scarlet. "I dunno, seems like we get a sunset like this at least once a week," Chris shrugged, turning back to his computer and maximizing a video of slaughterhouse animal cruelty.

Later, Jake IM'd me his research into the old nautical saying "red sky at night, sailor's delight; red sky at morning, sailor's warning":

When we see a red sky at night, this means that the setting sun is sending its light through a high concentration of dust particles. This usually indicates high pressure and stable air coming in from the west. Basically good weather will follow.

Red sky in morning, sailor’s warning:
A red sunrise reflects the dust particles of a system that has just passed from the west. This indicates that a storm system may be moving to the east. If the morning sky is a deep fiery red, it means a high water content in the atmosphere. So, rain is on its way.

11/12/13 sunset: never forget. Where were you during last night's sunset?

It's been over 12 hours; is last night's sunset still relevant?

G train FTW!