Earlier this week, the NY Times looked at how the "New York brand" is co-opted into many more products these days, from brand names (Maybelline New York) to product names (the Subaru Tribeca SUV, Seven for All Mankind jeans' New York Rinse). And why does everyone want a piece of the Big Apple? Mayor Giuliani "cleaning up" the city, September 11, and TV shows Seinfeld, Sex and the City, and Friends - you know, shows without ethnic characters. There were some we think the article forgot, most notably the Olsen twins heading to NYU and The Apprentice, which, while annoying, has an opening that's like a Valentine to the city. Anyway, Gothamist felt both proud that New York City has that must-have cache but also wary, because what do these other people really know about New York? Do they get sweaty from waiting on the subway platform, because it's 100 degress there while it's at least 20 degrees cooler outside? Do they agreeably wait an hour for a table at the latest brunch place? Do they pay $15 for a cocktail? Do they have their toes run over by all the baby carriages on Seventh Avenue? Maybe the city has a point in trying to show what is made in NYC...

Anyway, there doesn't seem to be a stop to this, because one expert told the Times, "I think the next wave [of names to be used] will be neighborhoods like SoHo that still have an aura of authenticity. And for those who don't know what it is, it still sounds hip. I wouldn't be surprised if neighborhoods in the Bronx were next." Hmm, Gowanus sounds like an Urban Decay lip color, Flatbush would be a great gardening tool, and Flushing-Meadows is perfect for a Drano-like product.

And in a little over a week, New York will welcome Advertising Week 2005; Tony The Tiger, Mr. Peanut, Mr. Clean, the Pillsbury Doughboy, Smokey Bear, Cap'n Crunch, McGruff the Crime Dog and more ad friends will march from Times Square on September 26 at 10AM. The New York Public Library's Science, Industry and Business Library at Madison and 34th Street will have some lectures and exhibits of advertising.