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The New York Times compared its occupant to the Sheraton hotel chain and The New Yorker called it a "gorgeous gemlike tower." And, ahem, plenty of others have weighed in.

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That's right. We're talking about Norman Foster's Hearst Tower at 57th Street and 8th Ave., also New York's first completely green high-rise. As of this week, it's also the new home of O, The Oprah Magazine staffers.

Including Editor-in-Chief Amy Gross, whom we saw in the elevator sans traditional buttons (down in the lobby, you press the number of the floor that is your destination on a digital pad). "We're so happy," she said as a group of us - an art consultant and a daily news reporter from Germany - headed up to O's 35th floor nest.

We'd be happy, too. In most skyscrapers, corners - and their lavish views - are prime real estate. Not so at the 78-year-old Hearst Tower or O, at least, where several are completely open and accessible to everyone (which, we think, likely makes said everyone less drone-like at 4 pm). And, get this, the glass offices are transparent. Really. According to the architect on the site, blinds are restricted.

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