The last Friday of August was a sultry, steamy, and sticky day. Which was just the appropriate weather to find the Outdoor Co-ed Topless Pulp Fiction Appreciation Society enjoying the day with some popsicles and, yes, pulp fiction on the High Line.

The group has been meeting for the past few years. Way back in 2011, the police asked them to put their tops back on, not realizing baring breasts is totally legal. (Don't worry: Cops understand this now, most of the time.) When I noticed the mostly female group—there was one man, with his shirt unbuttoned—standing around, there was a large number of other Labor Day weekend High Line visitors, doing double takes or staring and whispering, debating whether to take their pictures.

One woman, who wished to remain anonymous, described what the group does as a combination of "performance and activism." Another, who only gave her first name, Tiana, said it was "important" for them to take this stand for their right to be topless, "Nothing is going to change [society's attitude] unless someone tries to change it."

Tiana also added that there were some men who just didn't get that it was incredibly invasive and rude to walk up to her and her fellow topless pulp fiction fans and take their photos. After National Go Topless Day, one member of the group wrote about their encounters with some overly enthusiastic men who do things like "sit just a little too close... lurk in nearby bushes (that has to be uncomfortable, dude)" and "snap incessant pictures even when asked to stop.

Too enthusiastic is doing shit you’d never in a million years do if we had shirts on, and that you would never in a billion years do to a guy you don’t know, whether or not he had his shirt off. It’s stuff that violates the universally comprehended rules of common courtesy and personal space. Yes, we’re out in public, and yes, we’re doing something you don’t see every day, so sure, you might feel like snapping a picture to remember it by or to show your friends. That’s fine.

Last weekend, though, Outdoor Co-ed Topless Pulp Fiction Appreciation Society happily reported there was "nary a hostile nor a creepy stare to be found."

Here's their book list: