In November, I asked four of our regular photographers—David "Dee" Delgado, Scott Heins, Sai Mokhtari and Gretchen Robinette—to spread out across the city and photograph New Yorkers while asking what they will remember about the past decade. The answers ranged from the highly personal to the big headline news items we saw over the years, and of course, the things we all experienced living in this crazy, exhausting, joyous, perfectly imperfect place.

The devastation wrought by Superstorm Sandy, policing and criminal justice issues, and frustrations with the cost (monetary and otherwise) of living here were brought up a lot, but an overwhelming amount of hope also came to the surface. As Dorothy Parker once said, "London is satisfied, Paris is resigned, but New York is always hopeful. Always it believes that something good is about to come off, and it must hurry to meet it." That's as good an attitude as any to carry into 2020.

Below, more than 60 New Yorkers, from all five boroughs, answer our question: As a New Yorker, what is something you'll remember from the 2010s? — Jen Carlson

Cheri

Sai Mokhtari / Gothamist

"The last decade has been a major transformation for me, spiritually. I just feel invincible. I feel that I am fulfilling everything I'm supposed to fulfill and it’s wonderful. Life is amazing. We are stronger and more powerful than most of us believe, and to find that power and strength is awesome." — Cheri, Prospect Heights

Ed Garcia Conde

David 'Dee' Delgado / Gothamist

"There are really so many things, to narrow it down to one... I'm gonna keep it positive. I don't want to say that the Bronx is back, because we never went anywhere, but population-wise we finally got back everyone who disappeared. The 400,000 who disappeared between 1970 and 1980, and our population is above our peak population of 1970. I think that's the biggest milestone of the decade, we had people flocking back to the Bronx and calling it home. The comeback story, so to speak.

For me, I'm gonna go really personal: I finally conquered my battle with anxiety and panic attacks that defined my entire decade, and I can say going in to the new decade, I'm going in with a much better outlook on my mental health. I got through that journey by finding good mental health care in the Bronx, a lot of it was also through exercise. Biking actually helped me... when I started cycling exclusively, it got rid of the daily MTA experience. [And] it gave me this extra boost of endorphins I needed, I guess. Things got better... after suffering for an entire decade." — Ed Garcia Conde, Melrose, the Bronx

Devon Mitchell

Scott Heins / Gothamist

"[I came] to the city and I was homeless and jobless, but in just a month I was able to get a job. I worked my way to a supervisor role. Right now this is the best moment I can think of, my life in New York. There's a lot of opportunities in this city, you just have to work and hunt for it. That's what really sticks out to me, my best memory of being here." — Devon Mitchell, 27, Harlem

Anyely De Los Santos

Scott Heins / Gothamist

"Just the fact that crime has increased a lot. Everywhere. I live around here and it's not that bad compared to other places. I work in Downtown Brooklyn and there's something going on there. A shooting out of the blue or someone stabbed. It's sad. But I also feel like people have become nicer since this stupid Trumpism. We're more caring for each other. This community around here gathers and includes everyone." — Anyely De Los Santos, Jackson Heights

Kaitlyn Martinez

Scott Heins / Gothamist

"Junior Guzman, the boy that was slain in the Bronx and no one did anything for. The community failed him. The policing that they're doing in the subway systems, I don't think that's fair. They're cracking down on a lot of poor people. I'm from the area around Yankee Stadium in the Bronx and I see a lack of development there." — Kaitlyn Martinez, 24, High Bridge

Joe Conzo

David 'Dee' Delgado / Gothamist

"Retiring from the Fire Department after 27 years, and traveling the world as a photographer. I still can't believe as a kid from the South Bronx that I've been to Bulgaria, Asia, all over the world. The defining moment from me on a real close personal level is battling pancreatic cancer, 9/11-related, and overcoming it. That's my defining moment. And being out here demonstrating against gun violence, it's been in my blood since 5 years old, on the same streets, dealing with the same problems." — Joe Conzo, Mott Haven, the Bronx

Giacomo Francia

David 'Dee' Delgado / Gothamist

"Well I moved to New York City exactly ten years ago, and that has changed my life, because Italy was facing a major crisis in 2008, 2009... I was afraid of not finding a job, and of being unemployed. I came to New York and studied and found a job I really loved, and really became a professional in this city. All of my work experiences are here in New York. So I really am very thankful for that, it's a choice I was unsure of back then, but it proved to be the right thing to do, and yeah, here I am." — Giacomo Francia, Morrisania, the Bronx

Edgar Santana

David 'Dee' Delgado / Gothamist

"I enjoyed seeing two of my photos on billboards in my home borough, that was definitely a memorable moment to me. And getting married to my beautiful wife. Those moments I cherish." — Edgar Santana, Woodstock, the Bronx

Moey Hoque

Scott Heins / Gothamist

"Racial profiling. Especially when you go into the subway they have these little racks to the sides where they check people's bags. I wouldn't say I've felt victimized before, but they are looking for people of color. It feels weird. I remember one time I had a really big professional camera, and I was taking pictures on the subway, and I was pulled to the side by a cop and asked what I was doing. I had to explain to them that I just bought a camera and was testing it out, but then all of a sudden so many people were called in to ID me. I showed them my business card but they thought I was very suspicious. It was odd, especially in a borough as diverse as Queens. Racial profiling has been increasing over the years." — Moey Hoque, 28, Elmhurst

Savita Chugh

Scott Heins / Gothamist

"The level of diversity in Jackson Heights has increased a lot. Doubled or tripled, compared to what it was before. It was a slow progression, it used to be a lot of people from all over the world. In the last ten years there have been many coming from Tibet and Nepal. They take the opportunity come from those countries and then they grow and work and start businesses." — Savita Chugh, 60, Jackson Heights 

Tony Franco

Scott Heins / Gothamist

"What can I tell you? My memory of the last ten years is that all the money you make here you have to spend. That's the thing—people who come from another country, every year you have a new thing or project. If you try to be healthy, you have to spend a lot of money here. You take care of yourself. If you save money in one way, you have to spend it another way. The best thing here is to try and live in peace. Think about God. Don't do things that are wrong." — Tony Franco, 57, Corona

Barry Bearak

David 'Dee' Delgado / Gothamist

"The Cubs won the World Series, I have been waiting 108 years for this, and I was so incredibly happy... and then six days later Donald Trump was elected as President of the United States and it all went down the toilet." — Barry Bearak, Mott Haven, the Bronx

Saleem Jahangir

Scott Heins / Gothamist

"The strongest memory of my last decade is the snow of 2010. The whole city was under more than two feet of snow. I couldn't go to work for three days. My apartment, where I used to live, the buildings around it looked like I was in a white garden. That's the best memory I have. In 2017, I took my whole family to tour all five boroughs of New York City. It took me a whole day, from 8:30 in the morning until 7 at night." — Saleem Jahangir, 55, Jackson Heights

Henry Chalfant

David 'Dee' Delgado / Gothamist

"One memorable moment for the decade was the opening of my retrospective exhibition at the Bronx Museum of the Arts. A show called Art vs Transit, and it has all of, or almost all of my graffiti and hip-hop documentation from the '70s and '80s."— Henry Chalfant, Mott Haven, the Bronx

Carol

Scott Heins / Gothamist

"I think de Blasio has totally destroyed the city. Too much construction, transportation isn't reliable. Streets are blocked when they shouldn't be. Things were absolutely better under Bloomberg, I'd like to see him be president." — Carol, Upper East Side

Joe Stanton

Scott Heins / Gothamist

"It's Sandy. That was a crazy couple of months. It changed the way I think we look at the city and how it's set up for the future. I was in Jackson Heights at my mother-in-law's. For us, it wasn't so bad. I remember the day it hit we went to a drag brunch at a Thai restaurant on Broadway. Jiggly Caliente from RuPaul's Drag Race was there. Once we finished up, we all said to ourselves 'Oh we should go home, this is dangerous!' After that, the gas lines and flooding in the subway, that sticks out. I remember being not worried about the hurricane, but later realizing so many people died. Now, it's 2020 and we're still dealing with it." — Joe Stanton, 35, Astoria

Hasnaa Moudini

Scott Heins / Gothamist

"The parks have gotten better. So many have been renovated, they're getting better and it makes a big difference. The libraries also." — Hasnaa Moudini, Astoria

Dimitri P.

Scott Heins / Gothamist

"It's gotten more expensive. I've lived in New York 45 years and driven a cab for 20. Business has been down 50 percent from what we used to make, because of Uber. More traffic, more congestion. More stress. I hope the future is better but I don't see it happening soon." — Dimitri P., Astoria

Roseanne Lentin

Scott Heins / Gothamist

"Sandy, of course. I listen to Q 1043 classic rock and roll, every day, for many years. And this morning they talked about the 12/12/12 concert where Paul McCartney sang with Nirvana. At the time I lived in Montclair, and I didn't come in to the city for the concert but I regret it to this day." — Roseanne Lentin, Hell's Kitchen

Rebecca Moses

Scott Heins / Gothamist

"I just moved back to New York ten years ago ... On election night I was in Italy, and I kept calling to see what was going on. I spoke to my partner at like 4 in the morning and he was in tears crying. It was surreal. It was really disheartening and shocking that someone so incompetent would become president of the United States. For the most part, I do feel that New York is a more unified city. We're such a melting pot and that's what defines us. It's what I love about it. I think the cost of living in New York in the last ten years has just become impossible. They're forgetting about working people and creative people. It worries me—if we lose the creative and entrepreneurial attitude." — Rebecca Moses, Midtown

Abigail Montes

David 'Dee' Delgado / Gothamist

"For me, the 2010s will be summed up in terms of a lot of activism. Serious activism. Against police brutality. Activism against the gentrification of neighborhoods, specifically in the Bronx where I'm from. Activism for equity, affordable housing. [It's also been] a period of escalating violence, violence against citizens by the people who are supposed to protect them, violence throughout our country. What's happened in the 2010s has been overwhelming, too many incidents, you almost become numb." — Abigail Montes, Parkchester, the Bronx

Bryan Dougherty

Scott Heins / Gothamist

"New York has been tiresome. You put so much energy in and it gives so little energy back, but you still have these wonderful moments. Those nights when you end up on a rooftop somewhere in the middle of Manhattan. You think 'How did I get up here? How am I this high up when I was that low six hours before?' When you decide that you're a New Yorker. I decided when someone started asking me for directions." — Bryan Dougherty, Harlem

Kenneth Parris III

Scott Heins / Gothamist

"I had a son, that's a big thing. He's two. I got married eight years ago in the city. My wife danced for Merce Cunningham so I saw the final Merce Cunningham performances at the Armory. Truman Capote said that at a certain point a city takes more than it gives, and I've gone through that with New York. It's relentless, it's unforgiving, you get beat up here so much, but then you also find your way. People are from all over the world, so everyone's an outsider and we all find each other and help each other out." — Kenneth Parris III, Kensington

Rebecca Arnall

Scott Heins / Gothamist

"When I first got here I ran the Tunnel To Towers race. There's the NYPD and FDNY and people from all over, and I just loved the feeling of everyone together all supporting one another and remembering. It was one of my strongest New York moments, people trying to encourage others to keep running for a cause." — Rebecca Arnall, 28, Gramercy

Brandon Robinson

David 'Dee' Delgado / Gothamist

"Graduating college. That's gonna define it, because you know what, once you got it they can't take it away, and education is the answer to the future." — Brandon Robinson, Upper West Side

Sai Mokhtari / Gothamist

"I turned 30 this year. That was a redefining moment. There were lots of expectations and things that I thought I had to have set in place before 30, and none of it being what I wanted it to be….and you get to wake up the next day and be like Oh - I'm still here, and it’s not that bad! So I'm just redefining the things I thought I needed to be successful and be happy." — Janelle, Crown Heights

Sai Mokhtari / Gothamist

"I think I remember when the trains went up from $2, going up to $2.75. THAT’S what really stands out to me about living in New York over the past 10 years." — Anna, Crown Heights

Sai Mokhtari / Gothamist

"I bought a house in the Catskills and I'm slowly learning how to transition out of the city after being here for about a decade. The work is here, and I think if I'm going to keep being here-ish, I need some kind of escape. This is my main hustle, but I have 5 other dog walkers working for me in this area. I’ll always kind of be here part time but the goal is to be out there more." — Leanna, Crown Heights

Luis Pedragosa

Scott Heins / Gothamist

"I remember Hurricane Sandy. I had a six month old. I was living on the East side and I could see 34th Street. I remember all the warnings, but my wife and I said nothing was going to happen. But all of a sudden we saw the water going down the street and we lost power right away. My wife got out but I stayed in the city. I had to take all our baby gear for our son down 20 flights of stairs. Once you crossed 39th Street everything was pitch dark." — Luis Pedragosa, Hell's Kitchen

Sai Mokhtari / Gothamist

"This neighborhood in the past decade has changed a great deal… this particular block, this particular building. There are many good and bad memorable events—about a decade ago, violence on this street was tremendous. People got killed just around the corner. The good thing about a decade ago though is it was not as chichi as it has become right now, you know we have this fancy coffee shop here that charges $2.50 for a small cup of coffee… I used to pay 50 cents for a coffee and less than a dollar for a scoop of ice cream and that’s no more." — Jose, Prospect Heights

Coco Mcpherson

David 'Dee' Delgado / Gothamist

"The highlight of the decade for me was going to Cuba, which was a lifelong dream, and it was everything and more than I expected it to be. Traveling alone for the first time, and being in a unique place that is misunderstood by a lot of Americans. I spend a lot of time right now thinking of how to go back." — Coco Mcpherson, Morrisania, the Bronx

Cynthia Rivera

David 'Dee' Delgado / Gothamist

"A defining moment in the past ten years was when I had an abortion at 25, it kind of put a different perspective for me on marriage and having kids and what it means to be a parent, and just realizing where I am in my life and knowing that what I want to do moving forward had nothing to do with that. Not really making a decision on being married, or my parents and that conventional sense of marriage — and I feel like that was a turning point for me, it was really important." — Cynthia Rivera, Mott Haven, the Bronx

Sai Mokhtari / Gothamist

"I just came back to New York, three weeks now, from South Carolina. I'm born and raised here in Staten Island. I left exactly 10 years ago. I have to say New York has changed a lot. It’s gotten very expensive! I love New York I love New York I love New York! But housing is a big thing that’s changed. There’s a lot of luxury apartments going up, I see a lot of people leaving here to go to other states where the cost of living is cheaper. I myself have a master's degree and I'm still looking for a job… it’s hard to get city jobs. It’s a lot more competitive now, between housing and work, but I'm not leaving, I'm not going to give up. I love New York. The south is okay, but culturally, people down there have a whole different mindset. Right now I can’t afford it [here] but I'm okay, I got family to help me until I transition on my own." — Falisha, Prospect Heights

Sai Mokhtari / Gothamist

"At the end of September when all the New York City school kids were doing the climate strike, and there was a parade of 6-year-olds marching down across the park. That was a brief glimmer of hope and optimism in a rather dark decade. The climate stuff… it feels like everything else we’re squabbling over is so insignificant compared to this massive problem which puts everything else into perspective." — Zach, Brooklyn

Sai Mokhtari / Gothamist

"We moved to Park Slope in 1966 and bought our house for $33K, over the years it has become more homogenous, more boring. [Back then] there were all kinds of outliers, there were weirdos, hippies... In this last decade, I remember the sale of a garage on Union Street for $300K for a one spot garage, and then they pay $300-400 carrier charges. So who does that tell you it’s open to? Not me, certainly! And now the obvious worry is whether the world is going to be around for 2030, with this guy Trump… it’s a constant aggravation. It’s not just background noise. It’s something that can make you physically ill just thinking about it." — Riva and Steve, Park Slope

Jason

Sai Mokhtari / Gothamist

"At 50, the doctor told me I needed to lose weight or start taking blood pressure medication, so I dropped 60 lbs in 6 months… Now I’m in the best shape of my life. As soon as I made these changes, I realized that that no heterosexual woman in NYC is comfortable with a man who out-dresses them…who exerts more style than they do. I met this girl on OK Stupid and I went to go pick her up for brunch and as soon as she sees me, her smile is gone and she yells out RED cause I’m wearing all red. She said, 'That’s more red than I’m prepared for!' and she runs back up the stairs! This went on for about a year… so now I’ve been sleeping with trans women. I figure what the hell, I’m over 50, I might as well see what it was like, and I have to say I was kind of disappointed… I was hoping it was going to be better or worse so I could have a strong opinion, but it’s about the same. So yeah, that’s how this decade has changed me.” — Jason, Brooklyn

Riyadh

Sai Mokhtari / Gothamist

"We closed the store for three weeks in December exactly 9 years ago. We took everything out, from the basement to the floor and made everything brand new, and then I go back home [to Yemen] and they call me and tell me I have to come back because the store is in my name and I need to change all of the accounts for the store. I keep having to come back. This round, I’ve been here 3 years straight. I want to go back to be with my family, [but] I'm waiting for the papers for my wife. I'm waiting for the appointment from immigration. If they give me the appointment and I'm back [in Yemen], they cancel everything. I have 3 kids— 8, 5 and 2 and a half — I’ve never touched him! But I'm waiting for the papers. I can’t leave again and come back, so I just wait." — Riyadh, Crown Heights

Pearl

Sai Mokhtari / Gothamist

"I’ve been worried about the environment. God bless the young people, for once in my lifetime they are sticking together and being strong. I’ve been around long enough to hear young people say 'we’re going to change the world' and not do it. Look at that young girl on Time magazine! These activists are saying 'fuck you,' and they’re not gonna take it anymore." — Pearl, Washington Square Park

Debbie and her dog Lentil

Sai Mokhtari / Gothamist

"I was diagnosed with an illness that very few people know about but millions of people have. it’s called myalgic encephalomyelitis (a.k.a. chronic fatigue syndrome). I got sick a long time ago but I slowly declined and in the last 2 years I started using a wheelchair, and it required an identity change. I used to work out every day. There’s lots of ableism that you don’t even recognize, cause you don’t even think to recognize it. That’s what privilege is! I’ll remember this decade forever. And I got this one (Lentil) who, besides my husband, is the light of my life." — Debbie, Washington Square Park

Lisa Kahane

David 'Dee' Delgado / Gothamist

"In 2014, I moved from the Flatiron District to the South Bronx, which means I was moving from one of the richest neighborhoods in the city to one of the poorest neighborhoods in the city. It had meaning to me, it gave my life some meaning that my life downtown didn't have, but it's proved to be quite difficult, actually." — Lisa Kahane, Morrisania, the Bronx

Teja

Sai Mokhtari / Gothamist

"I'm going to remember the day I woke up and brought out a bowl of cereal. I was really hungover. Actually, it was from Santacon, two years ago. Anyway I decided, 'why not add beer to this instead of milk,' and I did it, and I ate all of it. I will remember this because there was no reason to do that." — Teja, SoHo

Adrian

Sai Mokhtari / Gothamist

"Going to rehab. Going to rehab was a real life changing experience. Two years, three months ago. I’ve since gone back to school and gotten my degree. That was very much life changing." — Adrian, Tompkins Square Park

Stephen Cameron and Thomas Tregler Wilson

David 'Dee' Delgado / Gothamist

"I think my most memorable experience of the 2010s is that my family and I went on a road trip, and I primarily did all the driving — the first half was from Philadelphia to Kentucky, which was 16 hours straight. And we went all the way to Texas and drove all the way back, stopped at all these different destinations along the way. And it was exciting to spend that time with my family in the car, and just bond. Great experience, loved it." — Stephen Cameron, Morrisania, the Bronx

"This is my brother [Stephen, above], we have the same mom, different dads. I didn't find out until I was 20 years old that I had a brother. We were adopted by separate families, raised apart. I spent ten years trying to track him down, finally did, it was about ten years ago, it was 2010 when we met for the first time. So, pretty cool. Absolutely a defining moment." — Thomas Tregler Wilson, Morrisania, the Bronx

Max

Sai Mokhtari / Gothamist

"Moving to New York… I can’t help but think about home sometimes and how much nicer it is to have that little town life. I think I’ll always miss those mountains, I’ll miss those morning bike rides, I’ll miss living with my parents. I think I’ll just have to take away the fact that maybe I should have valued some things a little bit more because I miss it now. And now it’s my goal to move back to Scottsdale one day." — Max, Tompkins Square Park

Yassira

Sai Mokhtari / Gothamist

"I’ve had a momentous decade. I started to get serious about my artwork again. Going really deeply into photography and 19th century techniques is something I'm bringing with me into the next decade." — Yassira, Avenue A

Sonia

Sai Mokhtari / Gothamist

"Getting married, moving out from Madison, Wisconsin, settling into married life in New York. [Then] getting divorced and finding my way in New York as a single lady!" — Sonia, Lower East Side

Alex

Gretchen Robinette / Gothamist

"The best thing I've had is all the nice people who have helped me, all the nice gifts and blessings I have received." - Alex, Williamsburg

Francisco

Gretchen Robinette / Gothamist

"The most important thing that has happened to me is called the Green Light Law, which gives a driver's license to undocumented people in New York without a social security number or green card starting December 16th. I've lived here [in Brooklyn] for 17 years, so this is a big deal for me and my options for work." — Francisco, Bushwick

Phil

Gretchen Robinette / Gothamist

"Four years ago, I was diagnosed with sarcoma in my right foot. In a span of two months, a tumor, cancer diagnoses, then amputation. I lost a leg and then I discovered rock climbing in the city and that changed my life. I was sort of tricked into going by my dad, but then I fell in love immediately. Now I travel all over the world competing in international competitions." — Phil, Bushwick

Marty Rogers

David 'Dee' Delgado / Gothamist

"On 151st Street and in the larger community, and in my personal life, what I'll remember is the Bronx Documentary Center being established. At first I didn't know what it was, I think like everybody in the neighborhood, and then to realize it and become a part of it, and as a volunteer and community member... they've been nothing but a treasure for the whole community. It's been the greatest gift that our community has gotten in the last ten years. So I thank the good lord for the whole crew of the center, who are tireless. Their love, passion and professionalism, to teach journalism and photography, among many other things. And the partnerships they create with the parish, our school, our garden, and community-based organizations." — Marty Rogers, Mott Haven, the Bronx

Osaretin Ugiagbe

David 'Dee' Delgado / Gothamist

"A defining moment for the decade I believe would be when I quit my city job, and applied to grad school, and got in to grad school. That's a defining moment for this decade. I left a city hospital that I worked at for 7 years, and I left for London and decided to pursue something I was passionate about, and that's painting." — Osaretin Ugiagbe, Sound View, the Bronx

Sean

Gretchen Robinette / Gothamist

"I was arrested and then my life changed for the better." — Sean, Bushwick

Chris

Gretchen Robinette / Gothamist

"I moved to Maryland, then finally came back to New York. I was born and raised here. I am so happy to be back. Some people never explore their own city. New York City is like nowhere else. " — Chris, Staten Island Ferry

Emily

Gretchen Robinette / Gothamist

"One fateful night, 23 degrees out at one o'clock in the morning, I was at the lowest point I had ever been in my entire life. Then I saw this puppy, digging in a trash can. I said to myself, 'You poor little meatball!' And he looked up at me, and ran towards me, paws on my shoulder, nibbling on my ears, licking my face; then he followed me home. I found out weeks later he was from a junkyard and had been severely neglected. I have always been a huge dog lover but was waiting for the right time to get one. He just picked me, and was like, 'I am yours and we are doing this!' and my whole life turned right side up. He was everything I needed to make my life come together." — Emily, Bushwick 

Pete

Gretchen Robinette / Gothamist

"At the beginning of 2010, I got a piece of glass stuck in the top of my middle finger, and guitar was my life. But I didn't have medical insurance so I couldn't have it removed. I had to wait for it to naturally move far enough down so I could play again. Then about two and a half years ago it moved far enough down, and now I'm playing again, every day, like five hours a day. So that is the worst and best thing that has ever happened to me, all within the last 10 years." — Pete, Bed-Stuy

Stephen

Gretchen Robinette / Gothamist

"I stopped giving a shit what people think and my life greatly improved." — Stephen, Williamsburg

Daniel

Gretchen Robinette / Gothamist

"After some bad years, I discovered how to make the best of every situation." — Daniel, Staten Island Ferry

David

Gretchen Robinette / Gothamist

"Deciding to take the jump to get out of my comfort zone and land somewhere uncomfortable and follow my dreams, which was cooking. Ever since then [moving to New York], my whole perspective of the world changed. It really taught me to be humble, when I wasn't a very humble person before. It taught me so much and was the best thing to happen to me in the last 10 years." - David, Bed-Stuy

Sean

Gretchen Robinette / Gothamist

"My band got signed to a record label and I literally broke my hand the day of. It all still worked out though. I also quit smoking and started painting again." — Sean, Williamsburg

Cory (in the middle)

Gretchen Robinette / Gothamist

" I had what I thought was my dream job, and then I was fired. I was super defeated, but then I stumbled upon woodworking, ended up starting my own business, and now I make way more money than I ever did before. And I am way happier." — Cory, Staten Island Ferry

Ethan

Gretchen Robinette / Gothamist

I got a divorce, was the best thing to ever happen to me." — Ethan, Williamsburg

Serge

Gretchen Robinette / Gothamist

"My mom died of cancer two weeks ago. The outcome had never been very clear in the months prior to, so it was very unexpected. That sort of changed my outlook for the end of the decade." — Serge, Bed-Stuy 

Jonathan

Gretchen Robinette / Gothamist

"I decided to make fun more important in my everyday life, and shit just got easier after that." — Jonathan, Staten Island Ferry