After Oscar-winning producer Harvey Weinstein was fired from the movie company he co-founded, following a bombshell NY Times article detailing "decades of sexual harassment allegations," Meryl Streep has spoken out against the man she once jokingly referred to as "God."

Streep released a statement, saying: "The disgraceful news about Harvey Weinstein has appalled those of us whose work he championed, and those whose good and worthy causes he supported. The intrepid women who raised their voices to expose this abuse are our heroes."

The NYT article outlined years of Weinstein allegedly targeting young female assistants, actresses or others in media, asking them to massage him, watch him shower, or bathe him. At least eight settlements were reached, including one with an Italian model who accused him of sexually assaulting her in 2015, and one with actress Rose McGowan, for an unspecified incident in 1997.

McGowan is bound by a non-disclosure agreement (which does not admit to Weinstein's guilt, according to the Times), but in the past she has made references to a studio exec raping her.

Streep's publicist, Leslee Dart, released the statement to the Huffington Post, which slams Weinstein and addresses criticism that she and other Weinstein stars must have known:

The disgraceful news about Harvey Weinstein has appalled those of us whose work he championed, and those whose good and worthy causes he supported. The intrepid women who raised their voices to expose this abuse are our heroes.

One thing can be clarified. Not everybody knew. Harvey supported the work fiercely, was exasperating but respectful with me in our working relationship, and with many others with whom he worked professionally. I didn’t know about these other offenses: I did not know about his financial settlements with actresses and colleagues; I did not know about his having meetings in his hotel room, his bathroom, or other inappropriate, coercive acts. And If everybody knew, I don’t believe that all the investigative reporters in the entertainment and the hard news media would have neglected for decades to write about it.

The behavior is inexcusable, but the abuse of power familiar. Each brave voice that is raised, heard and credited by our watchdog media will ultimately change the game.

Streep won numerous awards, including an Oscar and a Golden Globe, for her portrayal of Margaret Thatcher in The Iron Lady, which was produced by The Weinstein Company. During her Golden Globes acceptance speech, she said, "I want to thank God — Harvey Weinstein. The punisher. Old Testament, I guess."

NY Times reporter Brooks Barnes wrote:

From Thursday to Saturday, I called more than 40 entertainment industry players, and almost all refused to speak for the record. Some said it was because their companies (or publicists) needed to approve anything they would say, while others gave reasons that painted a picture of a community hobbled by fear, self-interest and hypocrisy. “Ladies of Hollywood,” Rose McGowan, one of the actresses who settled with Mr. Weinstein, wrote on Twitter on Friday, “your silence is deafening.”

A publicist for an A-list actress said there was no “upside” for her client to comment, especially since she did not have a movie to promote. One producer wanted to know who else was on the record so he would be “quoted in good company.” An agent said he was repulsed by the silence and quoted a Latin phrase meaning, “He who sits quietly gives consent.” Then he refused to talk.

This weekend, a reporter claimed that the NYT killed a similar story she was investigating in 2004. "In 2004, I was still a fairly new reporter at The New York Times when I got the green light to look into oft-repeated allegations of sexual misconduct by Weinstein," Sharon Waxman wrote on the Wrap. "After intense pressure from Weinstein, which included having Matt Damon and Russell Crowe call me directly to vouch for Lombardo and unknown discussions well above my head at the Times, the story was gutted... [it] never ran." It's unclear why the Wrap or another outlet didn't run the story over the past 13 years.