Late last month, Zosia Mamet and her sister quietly launched a Kickstarter campaign with the goal of raising $32,000 to make one music video for their band, The Cabin Sisters. It was a glimpse into how the other half's brains work—why spend your own money when you can just ask someone/dad? But even once the word was spread by her more influential friends, like Lena Dunham and Zooey Deschanel, it became clear no one was spending their own hard-earned money on funding an over-priced video for two very well off, connected women who have never once offered to dip into their own deep pockets to, like, pay off our student loans or whatever.

THIRTY TWO THOUSAND DOLLARS!

What they got in the end was $2,783 from 80 different backers, none of whom pledged more than $100. Chalk one up for the unconnected nobodies.

Hopefully the massive fail will resonate with other connected, wealthy creatives who are using the platform as a freebie. As Kevin Smith recently pointed out, it's "not fair to real indie filmmakers who need the help. Unlike back when I made Clerks in '91, I've GOT access to money now—so I should use that money and not suck any loot out of the crowd-funding marketplace that might otherwise go to some first-timer who can really use it. So if I can get away with it, I'm gonna try to pay for Clerks III myself."

This isn't the first time the actress has shown that she may not live in the same world as the rest of us. When we talked to her earlier this year, we asked her about something she mentioned in a NY Times profile about being saddened by people hating their jobs and not just doing what they love instead, hinting to her that this is not a very realistic philosophy. She told us, "You know I probably could have made more money faster and not have to work as hard if I, like, became a dentist. But I wouldn't be happy, so you know, it's definitely... I'm not saying it's easy per se, but I do think it's absolutely attainable."

Zosia may never "get it," but maybe others will back off the crowdsourcing now that her Kickstarter, and others, have been widely criticized.