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Even though Stuart Elliott's "Twenty Little Questions" in the NY Times Media & Advertising column strikes us as having only about five good questions (like wondering if Matthew McConaughey's films would go straight to video) and fifteen fillers, Gothamist was impressed that Elliott noted this:

Did anyone notice that as hundreds of posters for the Akademiks clothing company carrying the headline "Read books. Get brain" were being removed from buses and subway cars by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority because the phrase is a vulgarism in hip-hop slang, a print version of the same ad was published in the December/January issue of Vogue Teen magazine?

In just a few run-on words (which we have nothing against), Elliott gets to remind readers of the MTA's embarrassment (which Gothamist covered) and question the content of a magazine that impressionable young women are purportedly reading. However, probably due to some NY Times decency ruling, he can't really say explain that the vulgarism is related to oral sex to the column's readers, mostly ad people and brand marketing managers - the parents of said kids.

Hillary Duff is on the cover of Teen Vogue. Gothamist's favorite teen queen, Molly Ringwald, is in New York magazine, which reveals she's writing for local newspapers (though not in NYC) as well as acting!